Older women vagina intercourse-

Millions of women experience pain before, during, or after sexual intercourse—a medical condition called dyspareunia. This common problem can sap sexual desire and pleasure, strain relationships, and erode a woman's quality of life. For postmenopausal women, in particular, it can bring up issues of aging and body image. Many women suffer in silence because they're embarrassed or can't find a doctor who specializes in problems of this nature. The May issue of the Harvard Women's Health Watch describes how dyspareunia can be treated, and guides women to get the help they need.

Older women vagina intercourse

Older women vagina intercourse

Vaginismus or Pelvic Floor Muscle Dysfunction. Vaginal estrogen cream is sold under brand names like Premarin and Estrace. Women also learn exercises to help strengthen pelvic floor muscles, which may have been weakened by Amateur cowgirl pussy, childbirth, hormonal changes, and certain physical strains. Your doctor can also check to see whether another condition is causing your pain. Choose cotton underwear, and avoid tight clothing.

Bleeding sore in nose. Why sex hurts

Pat: I am a year-old divorced woman and have not had intercourse for three years. Fellatio is another cornerstone of Older women vagina intercourse sex without intercourse. Plastic Planet : Be Afraid. The reasons that women are discouraged from using systemic hormone therapy as they age is the natural risk that each of us has for increased stroke, Amateur venezuelan clots, heart attack and breast cancer that go along with aging. I feel so much safer using what I do. If there are muscle adhesions, tension, or trigger points, this restricts movement and causes pain during and following intercourse. Manage your email preferences and tell us which topics interest you so that we can prioritize the information you receive. Alternatives for Women Not only are hand massage and cunnilingus readily available to couples who can't manage intercourse, they're also more likely to bring women to orgasm. Cancel Continue. Women's Voices for Change may use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with Older women vagina intercourse and to provide email updates.

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Millions of women experience pain before, during, or after sexual intercourse—a medical condition called dyspareunia. This common problem can sap sexual desire and pleasure, strain relationships, and erode a woman's quality of life. For postmenopausal women, in particular, it can bring up issues of aging and body image. Many women suffer in silence because they're embarrassed or can't find a doctor who specializes in problems of this nature.

The May issue of the Harvard Women's Health Watch describes how dyspareunia can be treated, and guides women to get the help they need. Painful intercourse has many possible causes, including hormonal changes, medical and nerve conditions, skin diseases, and emotional problems such as anxiety and depression. Often, several are at work. The decline in estrogen production at menopause can thin vaginal tissue, resulting in dryness, burning, and pain.

Another culprit is vestibulodynia, a chronic pain syndrome that causes discomfort with any kind of touch or pressure in the area around the vagina. Psychological factors may be involved, especially in women who associate the vaginal area with fear or injury. Treatment often requires a multifaceted approach that includes medications and other therapies as well as self-care practices.

These are some frequently prescribed strategies for managing dyspareunia:. Low-dose vaginal estrogen. This is the main treatment for painful vaginal changes related to menopause. It can also help in some cases of vestibulodynia and vulvar skin problems. Vaginal estrogen has less risk of side effects than oral estrogen. Pelvic floor physical therapy. This relatively new technique hasn't undergone rigorous study yet, but experts consider it safe and effective. A physical therapist uses hands-on techniques such as massage and gentle pressure to relax and stretch tightened tissues in the pelvic area.

Women also learn exercises to help strengthen pelvic floor muscles, which may have been weakened by aging, childbirth, hormonal changes, and certain physical strains. Issues such as anxiety and poor communication in a relationship can contribute to painful sex, and painful sex can put stress on a relationship. Talking with a mental health professional or sex therapist may help. Treat vulvar skin gently.

Wash with mild soap or plain water and pat dry. Avoid perfumed products such as bubble bath and douches. Choose cotton underwear, and avoid tight clothing. Read the full-length article: " When sex gives more pain than pleasure ".

Disclaimer: As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date of last review on all articles. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

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I never had children. But research in both the United States and Europe notes that women frequently don't report their symptoms and, as a consequence, go untreated. Please return to AARP. Share using email. A menopausal woman loses approximately 70 percent of her estrogen levels, and when she has not had intercourse for three years, this combination causes the pelvic-floor muscles to tighten, making intercourse painful.

Older women vagina intercourse

Older women vagina intercourse

Older women vagina intercourse

Older women vagina intercourse

Older women vagina intercourse

Older women vagina intercourse. More on Sex

My gynecologist was very understanding. She explained that after menopause, all of the sexual areas—the labia, the clitoris, and the vagina—are deprived of estrogen, so prolonged contact causes dryness and discomfort.

She prescribed an estrogen cream, and after two weeks of using it I was able to have comfortable foreplay with my partner. However, I have not been able to have intercourse.

I use lubrication in the vagina and on the penis, but it is just too painful when he tries to insert the penis. I never had children. I have some arthritis in both hips from engaging in active sports most of my life, according to the orthopedist.

What can I do to make intercourse possible, or have I waited too long? Pat Responds:. This is a common story. Women who are postmenopausal do indeed develop thin, dry, inelastic genital tissue.

Many women who are not in a sexual relationship choose to use a bit of estrogen locally, just for improved comfort. Others have no symptoms until they want to begin a sexual relationship after a period of celibacy.

Women who never had a vaginal delivery often have a tighter vaginal opening. Women who have disorders that affect muscles, tendons, and joints in the hip girdle area often develop painful intercourse. Your gynecologist did the first thing right. She gave you an estrogen preparation that improved the mucosal tissue: It has become thicker, more elastic, and moist. Certainly the mucosa must be healthy before any further treatment begins; otherwise, the tissue will be unresponsive to manual and other therapies.

The remaining problem often requires some pelvic-floor physical therapy. Since many women live in areas where there is no one who understands this kind of therapy, I have asked Evelyn Hecht, P. I have also asked her to describe what she would do for a patient who cannot see a pelvic-floor therapist. Evelyn Hecht Responds:. A menopausal woman loses approximately 70 percent of her estrogen levels, and when she has not had intercourse for three years, this combination causes the pelvic-floor muscles to tighten, making intercourse painful.

But the application of estrogen cream is just the first step of the treatment. Strengthening your weakened pelvic-floor muscles will be required—in sessions with a physical therapist or doing exercises at home.

I have found, in working with thousands of patients dealing with painful intercourse, that those who receive consistent therapy can start to feel better and return to intercourse within two months of treatment. Trigger points in the deep hip adductor muscles that can refer pain into the pelvic floor region.

They surround the vaginal canal, approximately 1 inch up from the vaginal opening. During intercourse, the pelvic-floor muscles have to be flexible enough to stretch and accommodate the penis.

If there are muscle adhesions, tension, or trigger points, this restricts movement and causes pain during and following intercourse. Questions will be asked about sexual symptoms such as superficial pain or deep-thrust pain during intercourse; whether pain continues post-intercourse; if there is constant perineal pain [pain in the area between the anus and the vulva]; fear of penetration; and difficulty with orgasm.

After the detailed history-taking, your physical therapist will educate you on anatomy of the pelvic bones and muscles, using an anatomical model. This helps you visualize the structures your physical therapist will be examining. Then she will ask you to relax the pelvic floor, observing the quality of the movement from tension to relaxation.

After obtaining your informed permission, the internal exam follows. She will feel for tissue excursion that is, whether one side is more flexible than the other side , again noting pain, adhesions , trigger points , and whether her palpation over specific muscles reproduces your symptoms which is a good sign. Muscle-strength testing of the pelvic floor follows. She will measure how strong your pelvic floor muscles are, whether your muscle can maintain that strong contraction up to 10 seconds, and whether all this be done up to 10 times.

Biofeedback testing may be next. So what's a loving couple to do? Fortunately, there's a satisfying alternative: sex without intercourse.

This strategy requires some tactical adjustments, but it allows older lovers to enjoy fulfilling lovemaking for the rest of their lives. Great sex minus intercourse involves the same leisurely, playful, whole-body caressing that sexuality authorities recommend to lovers of all ages.

But with intercourse off the menu, it focuses instead on the many other ways couples can make love: hand massage, oral sex and toys — specifically dildos and vibrators for women, and penis sleeves for men.

Sex without intercourse means taking new paths to mutual pleasure. The footing may be unfamiliar at first, but hasn't novelty always been the key to sexual zing? If you embrace new moves you both enjoy with love and laughter, sex sans intercourse might even become the best you ever had. Here are a few pointers to help you scout out this new terrain:. Age-Related Sexual Changes The biggest sexual issues women encounter after menopause are vaginal dryness and a decline in libido.

A lubricant can minimize dryness, and even if desire fades in the early years of menopause, it may rebound later. Most postmenopausal women still enjoy partner sex and don't want to see it end. Meanwhile, men past 50 typically lose the ability to get aroused from fantasies alone; physical stimulation becomes a prerequisite to an erection. Erections may also be less firm and more, uh, precarious. These changes are unnerving when you first notice them — which is the same time when some men conclude, erroneously, that they've reached the twilight of their sexual careers.

Even when these mechanics and dynamics make intercourse impossible, however, sex can remain remarkably fulfilling. Despite the changes that aging invariably brings, couples open to erotic alternatives will discover that they can still attain sexual satisfaction together. Alternatives for Men Hand massage of the penis is key to sex without intercourse. Many men over 50 often get a firm erection during solo sex but find that a partner's strokes do not achieve the same effect.

Because women may not appreciate exactly how men like to be fondled. The solution? Men can show women what they want. This may feel awkward for both partners at first, but it helps the woman provide precisely what the man desires. Fellatio is another cornerstone of great sex without intercourse. Oral sex can provide men with great pleasure — even if the penis is only partially erect.

Contrary to myth, a full erection is not necessary for ejaculation and orgasm. If men receive sufficiently vigorous stimulation, it's still quite possible for them to have a marvelous orgasm with only a partial erection or even a flaccid penis. Couples trying sex without intercourse might also experiment with a penis sleeve — an artificial vagina or mouth that, when lubricated, feels much like the real thing. Sold by sex-toy marketers, penis sleeves are easy to incorporate in partner lovemaking.

They are recommended for men whose erections are neither firm nor persistent enough for vaginal intercourse. Alternatives for Women Not only are hand massage and cunnilingus readily available to couples who can't manage intercourse, they're also more likely to bring women to orgasm.

Only 25 percent of all women are reliably orgasmic during intercourse. That means three-quarters of women of all ages must have direct clitoral stimulation to experience orgasm. When men have iffy erections, women can use a dildo or vibrator to achieve that filled-up feeling. Women might use these toys on themselves as their partner watches or gently caresses them. Or men might gently slide well-lubricated toys into their well-lubricated partners.

To more closely replicate intercourse, men might also try wearing a strap-on dildo. Sex-toy marketers offer dildos, vibrators and strap-ons. Great Sex for Life After decades of straight-down-the-fairway intercourse, it can be a challenge to discover the joys of reaching the green without it.

The user visits this site at their own risk. Take charge of your health. Between 25 percent and 45 percent of postmenopausal women find sex painful, a condition called dyspareunia.

While there are many causes, the most common reason for dyspareunia—painful sex—in women over 50 is vulvovaginal atrophy, a fancy name for a vulva and vagina that no longer have the beneficial effects from estrogen that they did prior to menopause. Lower estrogen levels significantly affect your vagina, impacting its ability to secrete lubricant, to expand and contract and to grow new cells.

Over time, blood flow diminishes, and the vagina and vulva can atrophy, or shrink, as cells die off and aren't replaced. The result? Soreness, burning after sex, pain during intercourse and, sometimes, post-sex bleeding. The good news is that vuvlovaginal atrophy is very treatable. One of the best treatments doesn't involve medicine!

Turns out that the more often you have sex, the less likely you are to develop atrophy or, at the very least, a serious case of it. That's because sex increases blood flow to the genitals, keeping them healthy.

As you might expect, if lack of estrogen is behind vulvovaginal atrophy, then giving back estrogen should help. However, most major medical organizations recommend starting with the local approach first because it keeps the estrogen right where it's needed, limiting any effects on the rest of your body. Studies on the estrogen ring, cream and tablets find extremely high rates of improvement in dyspareunia, with up to 93 percent of women reporting significant improvement and between 57 percent and 75 percent saying that their sexual comfort was restored, depending on the approach used.

Side effects vary. Most estrogen products applied locally are associated with minimal side effects. However, each woman's response can differ. When using estrogen creams, pills or rings, it is important to talk to your health care provider about any symptoms, such as: headache, stomach upset, bloating, nausea, weight changes, changes in sexual interest, breast tenderness, abdominal pain, back pain, respiratory infection, vaginal itching or vaginal yeast infections.

If you have had breast cancer or a family history of breast cancer, be sure to discuss your history with your health care professional, if you're considering using estrogen. Your health care professional likely has covered this topic with you already. Non-medicated lubricants. If you'd rather not go the estrogen route, consider using some of the over-the-counter products designed to increase sexual comfort.

Vaginal lubricants come in liquid or gel form and work by reducing friction. You may also try longer-lasting vaginal moisturizer, which is absorbed into the skin and can provide relief from vaginal dryness for up to four days.

Since many women over 50 do not experience vulvovaginal atrophy, women with sexual pain should be aware that there are other medical conditions that could be responsible for their symptoms. These include:. Vestibulodynia is the most common cause of sexual pain in women under 50, but it can also affect older women. Women with this condition feel severe pain when any type of pressure or penetration is attempted at the entrance to the vagina an area called the vestibule.

It is treated with topical anesthetics, estrogen cream, antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs often used for nerve-related pain and physical therapy.

Look for a physical therapist who is specially trained in pelvic therapy. This condition involves stinging, burning, irritation, rawness or pain on the vulva, the tissue that surrounds the vagina. The pain and irritation can occur even when nothing touches the area and is likely related to abnormal nerve firing. Vulvodynia is treated similarly to vestibulodynia. Vaginismus or Pelvic Floor Muscle Dysfunction. In this condition, the vaginal and perineal muscles involuntarily spasm with attempted sexual activity.

This can make vaginal entry very difficult or even impossible. Vaginismus can occur after a trauma such as nonconsensual sex , or it can be related to underlying physical conditions, including musculoskeletal injuries or vestibulodynia.

Vaginismus is often treated with dilator therapy in which women are taught relaxation techniques while using progressive-sized dilators in their vagina and physical therapy. Urinary tract conditions. Cystitis, which involves inflammation of the bladder, is a common cause for painful sex, because the bladder sits on top of the vagina and can be aggravated during sex.

There are several kinds of cystitis. Chronic interstitial cystitis is a painful bladder syndrome that causes bladder pressure, bladder pain and sometimes pelvic pain. Acute cystitis is a bacterial infection of the bladder or lower urinary tract that occurs suddenly and causes pain—often referred to as a urinary tract infection UTI. In postmenopausal women, lower estrogen levels change the pH and make bacterial infections more likely. Lack of estrogen also can make the vagina more vulnerable to vaginitis, including bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections.

Both can cause pain and itching. Other causes. A uterus that has "dropped" or prolapsed may cause pain during sex. Endometriosis, a condition in which the uterine tissue grows outside the uterus, usually ends after menopause but may continue in women taking estrogen and can cause pelvic pain. Sexual trauma and childbirth trauma, such as episiotomies or tears and repairs, may also cause painful sex. Unfortunately, most women do not talk to their health care providers about sexual pain or problems, nor do their health care providers bring up the topic.

In an international survey of women by the Women's Sexual Health Foundation, fewer than 9 percent of women said their health care professionals had ever asked if they had sexual problems. If you don't bring up the topic of sex with your health care professional, it may not get addressed. Talk to a gynecologist or urogynecolosist about your sexual pain.

They can offer the most options for treating this complex problem. Download a complimentary Symptom Tracker here! We're with you, now and forever. Other treatments include: Estrogen. Other Causes of Sexual Pain Since many women over 50 do not experience vulvovaginal atrophy, women with sexual pain should be aware that there are other medical conditions that could be responsible for their symptoms.

These include: Vestibulodynia. Time to Speak Up Unfortunately, most women do not talk to their health care providers about sexual pain or problems, nor do their health care providers bring up the topic. Target Heart Rate. Body Mass Index Calculator.

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Older women vagina intercourse