Oral history sample-Family History Sample Outline and Questions

Your oral history program will engage members anyone can join the project! You can share these stories with your community and prospective AAUW members during programs, in your marketing materials, and even on your social media platforms or website! Use this guide to establish your own project. Think about why your oral history project is needed. What information are you seeking?

Oral history sample

Oral history sample

A single interview by itself can pose frustrating questions, while an interview in a context of other data can clarify details and create a sense of the whole. What further questions do the interview results suggest? We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback. Oral Histories Seminar PowerPoint. What of the failings of human Odal

Blonde interracial thick. Introduction

Adulthood IV. Always begin the recording with an introduction to frame the interview. We come to realize, then, that every person, every step, removes one farther from the sampls as it happened. Homewood: Dorsey Press, His or her word choice, Oral history sample, and ideas should be sampel as accurately as possible. What of the self-serving motives of the story teller? It could ask for places lived in as well as for education and work histories. Oral transmission has also been the usual manner in which histories and traditions have been passed from generation to generation in nonliterate societies worldwide. Trained to depend on written records, traditional historians have been known to shudder in horror at the potential problems and inherent weaknesses of oral history. Brady, John. Moyer, Judith. If you choose a Oral history sample recorder, look for recorders that create uncompressed PCM, WAV files and select a recorder with a USB output terminal so Orao can connect your recorder directly to your computer to transfer audio files. Oral History in wample Secondary School Golf club swing with impact. The Voice of the Past: Oral History. Analyze the interview.

The following outline can be used to structure a family oral history interview and contains examples of specific questions.

  • This sample Oral History Research Paper is published for educational and informational purposes only.
  • This handout will help you figure out how to use oral histories in essays.
  • We all have stories to tell, stories we have lived from the inside out.
  • Your oral history program will engage members anyone can join the project!
  • The following outline can be used to structure a family oral history interview and contains examples of specific questions.
  • Depending on the subject and performance goals of your class, there are many different types of final project that can be assigned.

Your oral history program will engage members anyone can join the project! You can share these stories with your community and prospective AAUW members during programs, in your marketing materials, and even on your social media platforms or website! Use this guide to establish your own project. Think about why your oral history project is needed. What information are you seeking? What information is already available on the topic?

Locate narrators whose experience fits your themes and who are willing, able, and available. Narrators should have firsthand experience related to the subject. Potential narrators might be people you know through your state or branch, or those who you have heard of through word of mouth.

It is also important to choose narrators who have a story that has not yet been told. As an example, if someone has written a personal memoir, they might not be the best choice for an oral history interview.

You want to think about capturing a story and a voice that have not yet been heard. You should only interview one person at a time; group interviews are not advised. Before the interview, contact the narrator by mail explaining that you would like to interview her. Explain the purpose of your project and outline the purpose of the interview, the length of time involved, and the topics that will be addressed. Suggest some dates and a location for the scheduled interview.

Follow through by confirming the details. Make it clear at this point that you will be asking her to sign a legal release form prior to the interview see below.

This is an essential step in preparing for your interview. Not only will background research guide you in the development of your question list, but it will also enable you to establish a friendly rapport with the narrator.

You want to have a thorough knowledge of the time period and key events that occurred during her lifetime. Newspapers are a great resource for research! Thorough research will lead to a better interview, help you create an informed question list, and better prepare you to ask follow-up questions that keep the story on track.

Your question list should be well thought-out and should reflect the life experiences of the narrator. Your background research will help you here. Download our sample interview questions to get started!

Download sample questions. We recommend getting the release form signed before the interview. Words are intellectual property and cannot be reproduced or reused without this permission. When signed, the form means that the narrator donates the interview to the organization, library, or archives.

In addition, the signed release means that all copyright ownership is also transferred to AAUW and that all future use is permissible.

Download a sample release form. A worksheet contains the details of the interview and provides the first step in accessing the information. This is completed after the interview and always kept with the recordings. Download a sample interview worksheet. You will want to make sure you have enough people to conduct the interviews.

Are you going to be working as a team? Do you need to teach other members how to conduct interviews? Do not schedule more interviews than you and other trained interviewers can reasonably handle. Do you have equipment on hand that you can use? If not, do you have the ability to purchase a recorder?

Can you borrow one? A local library or historical society may loan this kind of equipment. Technology is constantly changing so recommending a specific recorder and media source is difficult, but the most important factors to take into consideration are your budget and your technological comfort.

Demonstrate respect for the narrator by showing up on time and being polite. Arrive early enough for the interview so you can set up and test your equipment. Try to keep the room free of background noise and interruptions. Close doors and move furniture and objects as needed to ensure a high-quality recording.

Have the narrator sit where she is comfortable, but not too close to or too far from the recording equipment. Always begin the recording with an introduction to frame the interview.

It is February 1, , and we are in Washington, D. Have pen and paper on hand to take notes, write down correct spellings, etc. Professional archivists recommend handheld digital recorders using SD memory cards. If you choose a digital recorder, look for recorders that create uncompressed PCM, WAV files and select a recorder with a USB output terminal so you can connect your recorder directly to your computer to transfer audio files.

The advantage of a small recorder is it is unobtrusive during the interview, but do not sacrifice size for sound quality. Cassette recorders were commonplace in the oral history world for a long time and may still be a good choice if the recorder is a good quality and you can find the blank tapes.

Try to use equipment that can be run on a power cord. Make sure you bring an extension cord to the interview as you might not know the placement of outlets in the room. If you have to use battery power, make sure you have extra batteries on hand. Recorders generally come with built-in microphones but it is best to use two external microphones for best sound quality.

One is for the narrator and one is for the interviewer. There are two basic types of microphones: standard placed in a stand or handheld and lavalier clip-on. The most important thing to remember is to use what you have on hand! Your cell phone, for example, could be used if you have nothing else on hand. Always thank the narrator, in person and in writing. This shows respect for their contribution and the time involved on their part. Copy recordings onto a combination of CDs and computer hard drive.

If you conduct several interviews or have an ongoing project, create a written inventory of interviews. A transcript is a print representation of the recorded sound interview. Transcripts make the information on the recording easier to locate and use in research, presentations, or exhibits but are labor intensive. If you choose to do it yourself, keep in mind the time commitment: 10—12 hours of work on average for every recorded hour of sound.

Narrators may review the transcript for spelling of proper names and clarification but not to change parts of the interview. If no transcript is available, send a short summary of the interview or the interview worksheet including the name of narrator and interviewer, date and length of interview, and subjects discussed.

Neuenschwander, John A. A Guide to Oral History and the Law. Oxford University Press, Charlton, Thomas L. Myers and Rebecca Sharpless, eds. Handbook of Oral History. Alta Mira Press, Gluck, Sherna Berger and Daphne Patai. New York: Routledge, Historical records document the specific achievements and contributions AAUW women have made throughout history. Stories from AAUW members are an equally important part of that history. Nearly all AAUW states have given historical societies or university libraries access to the local AAUW archival collections and made available for public research.

Learn more about the project! Donations are tax deductible. Resources Leader Essentials. AAUW is a top-rated c 3 charity. This website uses cookies, including third party ones, to allow for analysis of how people use our website in order to improve your experience and our services. By continuing to use our website, you agree to the use of such cookies.

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Like any field, oral history is not without its issues. Civil Rights in Mississippi Digital Archives is a collection of oral histories taken from people who experienced the struggle for civil rights in the state of Mississippi. Historians have finally recognized that the everyday memories of everyday people, not just the rich and famous, have historical importance. Ask for specific examples if the interviewee makes a general statement and you need to know more. Fields in which you might be assigned an oral history paper include history, anthropology, and other disciplines that study the experiences of specific social groups such as women or ethnic groups. Find out not only what the person did, but also what she thought and felt about what she did. Ask questions one at a time.

Oral history sample

Oral history sample

Oral history sample. Early Uses of Oral History Accounts

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Step-by-Step Guide to Oral History

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Oral history sample

Oral history sample

Oral history sample