Puppy older do socialization-Puppy Socialization: How to Socialize a Puppy

Join Now. Ideally, puppies are socialized early in life by being exposed to as many new experiences as possible before they reach twelve weeks of age. Sometimes, however, you're faced with the task of socializing an older dog. Perhaps you've adopted an older dog that was never properly socialized, or circumstances beyond your control prevented you from being able to properly socialize your young pup. Whatever the reason, socializing adult dogs is quite a bit different from socializing puppies.

Puppy older do socialization

Puppy older do socialization

Puppy older do socialization

When NOT to socialize an adult dog What if you have an adult dog? Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest. Also, having a dog who is oldfr and confident can even go as far as to save his life one day. If it's more important that you keep a steady running pace than that your dog has a chance to self-assess and relax after a sociapization bike encounter, the dog shouldn't go. So, the exposure continues and the dog gets more aroused. Would you like your pup to relax while bicycles pass, recognizing they're just background noise? So you are Puppy older do socialization to have to take things more slowly. At the rescue centre it took 3 men with leads to get him into my car to go home he was terrified of everything birds noises people dogs etc turns out he had been kept in a crate in a dark outhouse since he was a small pup. If you start Puppy older do socialization luring, even as your dog grows more comfortable he will be less likely to move forward or explore Registered nurse salaries for pittsburgh environment on his own. Poland - Polska.

Sex toys vigina vibrator. Related Posts

The revenue stream from undersocialized dogs is one that I would really, really like to lose. This period allows puppies to be exposed to a wide variety of sights, sounds, smells, and sensations without becoming fearful. Off-leash play is beneficial to puppies learning behavior cues, but the same practice can Puppy older do socialization detrimental effects on adult dogs. I filled the motel tub with an inch or two of water and floated several handfuls of kibble, creating a fun game for her. If you can take your puppy to socialization class, do it. Have Questions? Is there any way to help him? Without this experience, dogs can lose their ability to know how to behave appropriately around other dogs. When you are attempting a long drawn out process, it can feel as though you are making no progress at all. So you are going to have to take things more slowly. It indicates either a dedicated dog owner trying hard to do everything right, or an owner in denial regarding potentially dangerous behavior. Then yesterday she lunged and snapped at some random guy on the street.

Maybe your dog was very sick as a puppy and your vet recommended that you keep them inside and away from other dogs.

  • Socializing your dog through puppyhood and adolescence is one of the best ways to ensure that they become a friendly and confident adult.
  • Just so you know, this post may contain affiliate links.
  • Then yesterday she lunged and snapped at some random guy on the street.
  • That title is a typo, right?
  • And every dog ever born will be thoroughly socialized as a puppy.

And every dog ever born will be thoroughly socialized as a puppy. Socialization is the process that dogs need to pass through in order to become friendly and well adjusted. Some older dogs were never socialized properly as puppies. And they need someone like you to help them through this process later in life. There are a number of reasons why some older dogs miss out on the socialisation process including. Some dog owners do not know how to socialize their puppy. They feel torn between the need to keep their puppy safe from disease and the need to introduce him to lots of new experiences.

Sometimes disaster strikes a family soon after adopting a Labrador puppy. A young dog may even be relegated to an outdoor kennel or they yard, or abandoned at a shelter before he is able to adapt to living in human society. People that like the idea of an aggressive guard dog in and around their home may deliberately avoid socialising their Labrador to ensure that he does not become too friendly. Socialising an older dog requires a lot of patience in overcoming his fears.

The objective of socialisation is to help the dog feel comfortable in situations that he finds quite scary. These situations will vary from dog to dog. With puppies, we tend can socialize them quite quickly, exposing them to many new situations at once. As long as a very young puppy is near to you, he is likely to feel fairly safe. And you may not be able to pick him up in your arms, and comfort him.

So you are going to have to take things more slowly. Introduce the scary situation at such a great distance, or at such a low intensity, that it is no longer scary. If your dog is terrified of traffic for example, try to find a park or a large piece of open ground with a road running along just one side.

Spend time with your dog as far away from the traffic as possible, encouraging him to relax and eat or play, whichever impresses him most.

This could take weeks of daily outings. Food is a helpful tool and being regularly fed in situations that used to make your dog feel uncomfortable is a great way to help him overcome his fear. They are often afraid of so many things that simply venturing outside the home is extremely stressful for them. No matter how great he is at home with your family. These can be extremely dangerous and are likely to end up with someone getting bitten and the dog being destroyed. Severely fearful dogs or dogs that seem to react aggressively are very vulnerable during this process.

And so are the people around them. Unless you are very experienced and knowledgeable it is a good idea to enlist some help at the start of this process.

Sometimes a dog is aggressive for reasons other than holes in his socialization. Dealing with aggression and identifying the cause is a specialist subject and if your dog is becoming aggressive you really need to seek the help of a qualified behaviorist. Your vet should be able to recommend one. He will also be able to check your dog over to make sure there are no physical reasons for aggression. In some situations a muzzle can be helpful, it enables the owner of the dog to relax knowing that his dog cannot bite or hurt another dog or other people.

A relaxed owner is in a better position to help the dog relax too. A behaviorist will be able to advise you if this is an appropriate tool for your dog. A dog that is frightened of other dogs may be helped if you carrying a small bag of dry dog food with you. Not to give to give to your own dog, but to deflect approaches from other dogs. This tends to divert their attention away from the frightened dog and can enable you to move your dog further away from the source of his fear.

Not only because this helps you cover all the bases, but because it helps motivate you by letting you look back and see how far you have come. When you are attempting a long drawn out process, it can feel as though you are making no progress at all. A written record shows you that you are actually doing much better than you were a month or so ago.

Write down all the things your dog is scared of. It is a big task that you are undertaking but in many cases you will see steady progress as the weeks and months pass by.

Helping him to feel comfortable in situations that were once stressful for him will improve his quality of life. It will also enable you to take him with you more often and to have more fun together Socializing adult dogs can be challenging. It takes time and patience and you may need professional help at times.

But the rewards are well worthwhile, and in the weeks to come you will have a great sense of pride in what you have achieved for your dog. Have you socialised an older dog? A rescue dog perhaps? Let us know of any tips and advice you have for others in the comments box below. I purchased a 2 year old Japanese chin from a breeder. I have just recently realized how frightened he becomes over small changes. It makes me feel sad. I think over time, it will get better.

Still, I do not understand how any breeder could have missed this crucial step. I have been in the process of adopting a rescue.

His trial period is ending on Saturday at which time I have to make the decision to either keep him or return him to the rescue shelter. Pleas help, I was not expecting an over night miracle, but I was hoping to see an improvement.

My dog a Staffie cross terrier is turning 11 this year, he has poor socialization skills his whole life with other dogs. If he sees another dog across the street or even hears them he wags his tail madly, paces around the house and barks quite loudly, sometimes making whimpering noises- if we get closer he might try and fight the dog or bite them. Please help, I have no idea how to help socializes him. I just want him to be hapy in his old age. I have a 3 year old whippet. My dog got really upset and scared, he started to bark mad as well.

Since then he barks aggressively at other dogs whenever he sees one. Is there any way to help him? He has many people he is familiar with, goes to several different places, but they are the same many people and different places. Due to family illness, we have fallen behind on socializing. So, we are back in the saddle again going for walks in the neighborhood with lots of his favorite high value treats and trying short trips to dog-friendly stores.

However, when we are in the stores, if someone new approaches him, he seems scared. Am I pushing too much too fast? It is hard not to lose hope at times! On walks, he will take the treats and we slowly move past people standing in yards. Or we stay seated while people pass us, all the while feeding lots of treats. I adopted an 8-year old lab, Kvik, who used to be a brood bitch for a local breeder.

This is a very small kennel and I know for a fact that the dogs are well treated. Not even my year old daughter who lives with me. She was, however, not around much for the first 3 weeks after we got the dog. I discourage people from petting her except for those who visit the house regularly. The dog even growls or gives a wee bark when my daughter comes home. What can we do to help the dog be happier with my daughter?

We discovered she pees in the house at night. Distance and distractions are your best friend. While it has already been covered in the article, this cannot be emphasized enough. Keep in mind that it must be done. To have a truly obedient dog, the dog must be able to perform in all environments.

For those who know enough about training to know the standard is correction and reward, I would suggest no correction in this instance. This is one that I would pursue as fully energetic and reward. Make it as upbeat as possible. Best of luck! My lab, Sierra, is a 6 month old pup and she is very unfriendly to strangers. She growls at even friendly strangers when they approach her with treats. What should I do? Let her watch and listen to their noises and excitement from quite a distance away if you can do this several times in a week.

Watch her energy level and when she can sit comfortably watching them. Move her forward towards them a little at a time until she can sit watching them in a calm way this could take several weeks. Do not comfort her or talk to her during this time eventually she should be able to walk past a child and feel comfortable. I adopted a labxrottie rescue dog aged 3 he is a big dog. At the rescue centre it took 3 men with leads to get him into my car to go home he was terrified of everything birds noises people dogs etc turns out he had been kept in a crate in a dark outhouse since he was a small pup.

At first, keep them out of the nose-sniffing range, and use a treat or toy to keep doggy eyes on the human no challenge-staring at the other dog allowed. That guy had the strangest hat ever, but he knew how to play the target game for treats! It will also enable you to take him with you more often and to have more fun together Socializing adult dogs can be challenging. Please help, I have no idea how to help socializes him. Mistakes in socialization, even if intentions are good, can backfire and may even produce an overly shy or overly aggressive dog. It was an easy cleanup and I left no mess for the cleaning staff! Watch for the doggy language that signals good intentions.

Puppy older do socialization

Puppy older do socialization

Puppy older do socialization. Bringing Home a Puppy

Sometimes disaster strikes a family soon after adopting a Labrador puppy. A young dog may even be relegated to an outdoor kennel or they yard, or abandoned at a shelter before he is able to adapt to living in human society.

People that like the idea of an aggressive guard dog in and around their home may deliberately avoid socialising their Labrador to ensure that he does not become too friendly.

Socialising an older dog requires a lot of patience in overcoming his fears. The objective of socialisation is to help the dog feel comfortable in situations that he finds quite scary. These situations will vary from dog to dog.

With puppies, we tend can socialize them quite quickly, exposing them to many new situations at once. As long as a very young puppy is near to you, he is likely to feel fairly safe.

And you may not be able to pick him up in your arms, and comfort him. So you are going to have to take things more slowly. Introduce the scary situation at such a great distance, or at such a low intensity, that it is no longer scary. If your dog is terrified of traffic for example, try to find a park or a large piece of open ground with a road running along just one side.

Spend time with your dog as far away from the traffic as possible, encouraging him to relax and eat or play, whichever impresses him most. This could take weeks of daily outings. Food is a helpful tool and being regularly fed in situations that used to make your dog feel uncomfortable is a great way to help him overcome his fear.

They are often afraid of so many things that simply venturing outside the home is extremely stressful for them. No matter how great he is at home with your family.

These can be extremely dangerous and are likely to end up with someone getting bitten and the dog being destroyed. Severely fearful dogs or dogs that seem to react aggressively are very vulnerable during this process. And so are the people around them. Unless you are very experienced and knowledgeable it is a good idea to enlist some help at the start of this process.

Sometimes a dog is aggressive for reasons other than holes in his socialization. Dealing with aggression and identifying the cause is a specialist subject and if your dog is becoming aggressive you really need to seek the help of a qualified behaviorist. Your vet should be able to recommend one.

He will also be able to check your dog over to make sure there are no physical reasons for aggression. In some situations a muzzle can be helpful, it enables the owner of the dog to relax knowing that his dog cannot bite or hurt another dog or other people. A relaxed owner is in a better position to help the dog relax too. A behaviorist will be able to advise you if this is an appropriate tool for your dog. A dog that is frightened of other dogs may be helped if you carrying a small bag of dry dog food with you.

Not to give to give to your own dog, but to deflect approaches from other dogs. This tends to divert their attention away from the frightened dog and can enable you to move your dog further away from the source of his fear. Not only because this helps you cover all the bases, but because it helps motivate you by letting you look back and see how far you have come.

When you are attempting a long drawn out process, it can feel as though you are making no progress at all. A written record shows you that you are actually doing much better than you were a month or so ago. Write down all the things your dog is scared of. It is a big task that you are undertaking but in many cases you will see steady progress as the weeks and months pass by.

Helping him to feel comfortable in situations that were once stressful for him will improve his quality of life.

It will also enable you to take him with you more often and to have more fun together Socializing adult dogs can be challenging. It takes time and patience and you may need professional help at times. But the rewards are well worthwhile, and in the weeks to come you will have a great sense of pride in what you have achieved for your dog. Have you socialised an older dog?

A rescue dog perhaps? Let us know of any tips and advice you have for others in the comments box below. I purchased a 2 year old Japanese chin from a breeder. I have just recently realized how frightened he becomes over small changes. It makes me feel sad. I think over time, it will get better. Still, I do not understand how any breeder could have missed this crucial step. I have been in the process of adopting a rescue.

His trial period is ending on Saturday at which time I have to make the decision to either keep him or return him to the rescue shelter. Pleas help, I was not expecting an over night miracle, but I was hoping to see an improvement. My dog a Staffie cross terrier is turning 11 this year, he has poor socialization skills his whole life with other dogs. If he sees another dog across the street or even hears them he wags his tail madly, paces around the house and barks quite loudly, sometimes making whimpering noises- if we get closer he might try and fight the dog or bite them.

Please help, I have no idea how to help socializes him. I just want him to be hapy in his old age. I have a 3 year old whippet. My dog got really upset and scared, he started to bark mad as well. Since then he barks aggressively at other dogs whenever he sees one. Is there any way to help him? He has many people he is familiar with, goes to several different places, but they are the same many people and different places.

Due to family illness, we have fallen behind on socializing. In either case, socialization experiences aren't as they should be.

Is there hope? Yes, of course there's hope! But mistakes happen in the name of socialization with grown dogs, too. I get a lot of phone calls that run like this:.

Note: This phrase is the most poisoned of cues for a professional trainer. It indicates either a dedicated dog owner trying hard to do everything right, or an owner in denial regarding potentially dangerous behavior. Can you tell me exactly what you're looking for? Sometimes his hair stands up. So we know he needs socialization.

He sounds like he gets pretty worked up? Tell you what, let's do a private session…". He needs to learn to be around other dogs. Yes, that dog needs to learn to be around other dogs. But he's probably not going to learn well in a group class.

A dog with an over-the-top reaction is a dog too aroused to think clearly, process information, and retain knowledge for later.

In short, that dog is not going to learn, and I'd be wasting your time and money if I took that dog in a group class! Recently I had a client who did not want to waste time on a foundation lesson, who wanted to have the first lesson in the trigger situation. I explained that this was equivalent to taking a brand-new student driver onto the interstate and then trying to explain gear shifts, turn signals, and left and right pedals—all at 65 mph.

It's essential to have skills under stress; therefore, you have to learn them before you're under stress. So my client took a few weeks to practice the basic skills first. In her second session she was utterly amazed as her large mastiff-type dog, a dog she could no longer walk due to the strength required to restrain his reactive lunging, lay quietly on a mat and responded to cues. He was aware of a second dog, but stable and focused.

Yes, it was worth it. Learning happens in a mind that is still engaged. It's important to start teaching the dog new behaviors while he is still under threshold—and that's not going to be in a room with five other new dogs.

Not everyone recognizes the necessity of a foundation and of incremental steps. Instead, well-meaning owners, often thinking they're doing the right thing in "socializing," put their dogs and other humans and dogs in unfair situations—and sometimes even in danger. Most of these environments violate key points of the good-socialization checklist: the dog has no escape route and he cannot chose to leave and return of his own volition. Many people won't leave the trail mid-run or go home from the street fair after only twenty minutes if the dog is overwhelmed.

So, the exposure continues and the dog gets more aroused. By the end he is really confirmed in his reactions. Other people attending a community event did not sign up to rehabilitate a troubled dog; they came to enjoy a social outing. Putting a stressed dog in their midst neither helps the dog nor enhances attendees' enjoyment.

At best, it only confirms public opinion that dogs are often nuisances and should be banned from public areas. At worst, it creates more problems for the dog and puts others in danger. While I am a clicker trainer, look for positive alternatives, and wholly advocate non-violent solutions, I am rapidly approaching an unwelcome point.

If I have to intervene again to prevent a dog fight or a bite to a child while a dog owner explains that he or she is deliberately putting the dog in an overwhelming situation "to work on socialization," there's a good chance I will need bail and an attorney! If you are not willing to retreat if your dog needs it, do not take the dog with you.

If your dog is too aroused and cannot recover, your training isn't yet ready for the scenario. You need to quit before you create more problems. End of discussion. There are better ways to socialize your puppy or adult dog than to jump right in to group classes or wander far and wide searching out crowds of people and other animals. Successful training techniques prevent or solve problems instead of create them. Appropriate socialization training proceeds with steps, and ensures that the dog is ready to progress each time!

As illustrated by my client and her mastiff above, private training classes offer a fantastic head-start to socialization training. In a situation like that one with the mastiff, or any situation where an owner is looking to improve socialization skills responsibly, a good trainer will suggest a private session.

At that initial or evaluation session, the dog starts learning new ways to interact with his environment and his human. Most importantly, he learns how to interrupt his own arousal. The next step is to teach him to choose relaxation in the presence of his triggers other dogs, humans, etc.

These skills have to be learned before they can be used. Not to rule out field trips altogether, though! There is plenty of room in a socialization training plan for outings, as long as anticipation and care are part of the package. So, where to go? Match the scenario to the dog's current skill set. Has the dog ever been to a public event? If not, starting at the street fair with new asphalt substrates, a thousand people, several dozen food vendors, other possibly stressed dogs, music from the dance troupes, and the roar of engines from the car show is probably not a good choice for an outing.

How about starting with the neighbor's cookout, where you can introduce your dog to fewer people and then pop him back home after he's had a good time?

When I take a dog out to socialize, particularly if I know it will be challenging for that dog, I make sure my schedule is clear of anything but that dog. If you really need to cover all of the fairground's antique booths before you go home, the dog shouldn't go. If it's more important that you keep a steady running pace than that your dog has a chance to self-assess and relax after a close bike encounter, the dog shouldn't go.

That doesn't mean you can't ever run with the dog. It just means that you'll have to do some runs where you're willing to put dog training before your own training in order to get a great running partner for years to come. At other times I will go somewhere for a longer period, but with the option to retreat as necessary.

My car can be a very secure and safe place for a dog trained to relax comfortably in his crate. The car is protected from heat or cold and strangers, and can act as a base from which the dog can make forays into socialization experiences.

Obviously, this is not an option for a dog that doesn't regard his crate in the car as a haven, or with a car that isn't safe. Once you've picked a good field trip, assess your dog's skills. What behaviors is he really fluent at right now? There's no profit in trying to train a new behavior in a new environment. When the behavior begins to degrade—you ask the dog to sit, and he does it slowly, or he does it facing away instead of facing you as usual, or he displays some other variant you don't usually expect—be cautious.

The dog is challenged. It might be time to back off for a while or change tactics. Next, choose your goals for the outing; these will vary widely by dog and by situation. Would you like your pup to relax while bicycles pass, recognizing they're just background noise? Or do you need your shy dog to feel more comfortable passing or meeting strangers on the sidewalk?

Has your dog seen gentlemen with big beards and ladies with long skirts? What about other dogs, cats, horses rural residents or urban police mounts , skateboards, motorcycles, and other things not normally found in your living room? Will your dog be meeting or just observing? Out in the environment, start by asking for your "canary" behavior, and perhaps others, reinforcing generously.

You want the dog to think that new environments are fun and pay well! Now watch for your dog catching interest in something or looking to explore. Go with him, verbally encouraging him gently and reinforcing appropriate behavior with petting or treats.

How to Socialize an Older Dog | Hill's Pet

Join Now. Ideally, puppies are socialized early in life by being exposed to as many new experiences as possible before they reach twelve weeks of age. Sometimes, however, you're faced with the task of socializing an older dog.

Perhaps you've adopted an older dog that was never properly socialized, or circumstances beyond your control prevented you from being able to properly socialize your young pup. Whatever the reason, socializing adult dogs is quite a bit different from socializing puppies.

Dog socialization is the practice of acclimating your dog to other people and pets to help him better behave in these types of situations. In this process your dog will spend time with new groups of people including children or other pets and getting him more and more comfortable being in these types of situations.

Spending time immersed in situations that cou. Let's start with what dog socialization is in the first place. It is the practice of acclimating your dog to new people, places and pets in an effort to help him better behave in new and unfamiliar situations. After all, you don't want your dog to jump up on people, nip at children or cower when confronted by a larger dog. Without proper socialization, dogs may become anxious and fearful of anything unfamiliar.

This could give rise to serious behavioral problems, such as aggression or nervous behavior. Here are some signs that your older dog needs to be socialized, according to Dogster :. Socializing puppies is simply a matter of exposing them to as much of the world as possible.

When done at the right age, they easily absorb new experiences into their sense of what's normal. Socializing an older dog, on the other hand, can be a different challenge.

Depending on the size and breed, some situations have the potential to become dangerous if the dog should respond aggressively to something or someone. Here are some ways to safely go about socializing your adult dog:. The key thing to remember when socializing an older dog is that it takes time and a lot of repetition. Be patient with your dog, and don't be discouraged if his progress is slow.

Creating a calm, loving environment for your dog, along with positive associations with each new experience, will go a long way toward dispelling his fear and helping him become a happy, well-balanced dog.

And if you ever need more help in learning how to socialize your older dog, speak with a professional trainer or your vet. Jean Marie Bauhaus is a pet parent, pet blogger and novelist from Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she usually writes under the supervision of a lapful of furbabies. Facebook Twitter Pinterest Instagram Youtube. About our Ads. Belgium - Belgique. Brazil - Brasil. Canada English.

Costa Rica. Croatia - Hrvatska. Denmark - Danmark. Finland - Suomi. France - France. Germany - Deutschland. Greater China - Taiwan. Italy - Italia. Latvia - Latvija. Malaysia English. Netherlands - Nederland. New Zealand. Norway - Norge. Philippines English. Poland - Polska. Puerto Rico English. Republic of Singapore English. South Africa. Sweden - Sverige. Switzerland Suisse. Switzerland Schweiz. United Kingdom. United States. About Hill's. Contact Us.

Cat Care Education. Choosing the right cat food. Choosing the right kitten food. New cat parent. Log in. Dog Care Education. Choosing the right dog food. Choosing the right puppy food. New dog parent. Tips for Socializing an Older Dog. Published by. What is Dog Socialization Dog socialization is the practice of acclimating your dog to other people and pets to help him better behave in these types of situations.

Spending time immersed in situations that cou Signs Your Dog Isn't Socialized Let's start with what dog socialization is in the first place. Here are some signs that your older dog needs to be socialized, according to Dogster : Is he fearful or aggressive around people or other animals?

Does he back up or raise his hackles hair on his back when you or another person approaches? Is he nervous when out on walks? Is he shy around other dogs or people? Is he overly excitable that can cause anxiety in other pets or people? Socializing Adult Dogs Socializing puppies is simply a matter of exposing them to as much of the world as possible.

Here are some ways to safely go about socializing your adult dog: Use a muzzle: Especially with larger breeds, a muzzle may help prevent any unfortunate incidents should your dog become aggressive. Additionally, a muzzle may put yourself and other people at ease around your dog, points out Cesar's Way. Dogs pick up on their humans' moods, so if you and the other people your dog interacts with are calm and relaxed, your dog may be more likely to remain calm and develop positive associations.

Take him on walks : Going on walks not only expose him to new sights, sounds, smells, strangers and animals, but it will also allow him to burn off nervous energy, which may be calming.

Don't tug on his leash or scold him if he barks or responds in an undesirable manner. Instead, distract him with treats or his favorite toy if he begins to act fearful. Sometimes, just turning him and heading in the opposite direction can be enough to help calm him down.

Work up to taking him to the dog park: A dog park is a great place to acclimate your dog to other dogs and people, but taking him inside right away would be like throwing a new swimmer into the deep end of the pool. Instead, for the first few trips, stick to walking your dog around the perimeter of the park, letting him watch the other dogs from a distance.

Gradually work up to letting him approach the fence to sniff and interact with other dogs, and give him a treat whenever he does so in a friendly manner, to increase positive associations. If he reacts fearfully or aggressively, move him away from the fence and work your way back up to approaching it again. Introduce friends and family one at a time: With your dog on a leash, have new people approach him slowly, offering him a treat while speaking in a low, calm, encouraging voice. Avoid high-pitched baby talk, which could frighten your dog.

Allow strangers to give him treats or his favorite toy, so he can form positive associations with this person. If he pulls back or cowers, don't press the issue as it could make him more anxious, but rather have them try at another time. Choose times when he seems more playful or loving. Stay calm and act normal: Whenever your dog becomes frightened and acts up, the worst thing you can do is draw attention to his behavior, which will only reinforce his fear.

It's better to ignore your dog's anxious behavior and instead act calm and relaxed, showing him in the process that there's nothing to be afraid of. Contributor Bio Jean Marie Bauhaus Jean Marie Bauhaus is a pet parent, pet blogger and novelist from Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she usually writes under the supervision of a lapful of furbabies.

Check out this list of accessories you should consider getting for your senior dog to help care for him in his golden years. Crate Training an Older Dog: What You Need to Know Learn reasons why crate training an older dog might be a good idea, as well as an effective method for getting him comfortable and used to his new crate. Discover the truth about this cliche and learn tips for successfully training your senior dog.

Register Sign In.

Puppy older do socialization