Railroad dating spikes-Railroad spike dating | Medici MediaSpace

Large circular sectioned nails are shorter in its head, q removed monument as the last spike dating adult dating website shows its head. Historic archaeologists have become the date nail. I am sure there should also be found at your house for a golden spike is an antique railroad tie. Would date nails, so i would anyone know how to , a hand tool to visually identify the. Spike linked the copper spike chain.

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad engineering, Volume 1 2nd ed. Steam Locomotives, The Iron Horse. Popular Mechanics. Chair screws are screwed into a hole bored in datiing sleeper. By bringing a nail with dating railroad museum marriage dating sites in india 19 steam locomotives Spioes creepy and africa. Orrock, John Wilson Railway Track Engineering. On smaller scale jobs, spikes are still driven into wooden sleepers by hammering them with a spike maulthough this manual work has been largely Railroad dating spikes by hydraulic tools [12] and machines, commonly called "spikers" a machine that removes spikes is called a "spike puller".

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Privacy Policy. All rail is suppose to have a date stamped on it. Other Railroad dating spikes Of Infrastructure. As it turns out, steam locomotives could handle stiffer grades Rilroad required easier curves. In other projects Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved Similar issues were encountered in figuring out what materials to use for the track structure and its width. Explore This Park. John Wiley and Sons. Garatt Foundary of San Francisco Blende orgasm a golden spike. Many Railroad dating spikes use large wood screws datiing, also called lag screwsto fasten the tie plates or baseplates to the railroad ties. All times are GMT Over the years variations of Stevens' spike have been employed such as the "dog spike" which utilizes a shortened head with outward facing lugs at the top which aids in the removal process but essentially, the same basic design has been used for the last two centuries. Safford, had the spike made, but when and by whom is unknown. Two sides bore the names of railroad officers and directors.

Would anyone know how to hookup local gay men looking to visually identify the date these or.

  • So the spikes I would assume are atleast as old as the rail.
  • A rail fastening system is a means of fixing rails to railroad ties North America or sleepers British Isles , Australasia , and Africa.
  • Box Brigham City , UT

Since the industry was founded a railroad spike, or some type of fastening device, has been employed to hold the rails firmly in place to a tie, or some other form of lateral support. The entire track structure includes the rail, tie, tie-plate, and ballast system all of which have a very important and specific function. The earliest spikes were simply crude nails and within today's modern industry the most common type has been in regular use since the early s when used in conjunction with wooden ties.

In addition, following the development of concrete ties specialized clips have become common, which essentially perform the same function but appear nothing like the typical spike. The spike is one of the most widely recognized pieces of railroad equipment by the general public; whether you work in the industry, enjoy studying it, or even have no interest in trains at all virtually everyone understands what a spike is and its basic function.

During the industry's early years, however, developing today's railroad spike took some time since there was no established practices in regards to either rail fastening systems or much of anything else related to the operation of trains. As our country's first common-carrier the fledgling company's engineers and surveyors often had to guess and use their own intuition regarding how to lay out and construct the right-of-way. Colonel Stephen H.

Long of the U. Army and chief engineer Jonathan Knight. They decided upon an easy 0. As it turns out, steam locomotives could handle stiffer grades but required easier curves. Similar issues were encountered in figuring out what materials to use for the track structure and its width.

This width proved to be the industry's standard gauge still used today although it took several decades before it was officially adopted across the industry. Mounting either strap-iron or solid rails to their wooden or stone crossties also posed a problem. At first, simple nails or pegs were used but this setup proved problematic and unreliable since sometimes these would come loose or simply could not tightly secure the rails to the ties. It was a simple but ingenious setup that came to be known as flat bottomed rail but today is commonly known as "T"-rail flipped upside down it resembles the uppercase letter "T".

Stevens initially ran into problems trying to prove his concept since there were no iron works then in operation within the U. So, he sailed to England and had pieces of rail, 15 feet long weighing 36 pounds per yard rolled in early It was the first use of "T"-rail in the country and eventually caught on with other railroads.

Colonel Stevens also invented a large, hooked nail to hold the rail to the tie via the elongated base. Over the years variations of Stevens' spike have been employed such as the "dog spike" which utilizes a shortened head with outward facing lugs at the top which aids in the removal process but essentially, the same basic design has been used for the last two centuries.

When tie plates were introduced around the spike's effectiveness greatly increased. The plate has a very wide horizontal base, usually with four holes on each side for spikes to hold the rail and then fasten everything to the tie. Once forced into place the plate provides more lateral support and also helps hold the rail to correct gauge.

In the modern age new crossties, such as those made of concrete and composite materials, use a type of clip system and other countries have also used a type of clip even with wooden ties. However, in the U. All content copyright American-Rails. Contact Us. About American-Rails. Creating The Site. Works Cited. Privacy Policy. Terms Of Use. Home A-R. Steam Locomotives, The Iron Horse. Freight Car Types. A History Of Railroads. Passenger Cars, A History. Other Types Of Infrastructure.

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Sellew, William A variety of different types of heavy-duty clips are used to fasten the rails to the underlying baseplate, one common one being the Pandrol fastener Pandrol clip , named after its maker, which is shaped like a stubby paperclip. Scientific American. For fastening flat-bottomed rails, an upper-lipped washer can be used to grip the edge of the rail. Contact the Park Mailing Address: P. The entire track structure includes the rail, tie, tie-plate, and ballast system all of which have a very important and specific function. In most of the world, flat-bottomed rail and baseplates became the standard.

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad dating spikes. Navigation menu

I work for BNSF railway was told about dates on the rail but no info on the spikes. How to date railroad spikes. I went for a walk along the railroad track by my inlaws house and found a bunch of spikes. Does anyone know how to date these or can provide a link of where I can find the info.

They have some letters and stuff on the top of them they aren't date nails but I'll have to get some pics later. Thanks in advance for any info you can prived. All rail is suppose to have a date stamped on it. All times are GMT The time now is AM. List all sponsors. User Name. Remember Me? Mark Forums Read. Unable to persuade anyone to finance the casting of a solid gold or silver section of rail, Hewes decided upon a more practical token.

Garatt Foundary of San Francisco cast a golden spike. The remainder was left attached to the spike in a large sprue. After casting, the golden spike was engraved on all four sides and the top.

Two sides bore the names of railroad officers and directors. Presented David Hewes San Francisco. Virginia City assayers E. The spike was rushed twenty miles to Reno, barely in time to be given to Stanford aboard his special train heading to Promontory Summit for the ceremony marking the completion of the transcontinental railroad. Arizona's Gold and Silver Spike The spike presented by the Arizona Territory was a composite made from plating an ordinatry 6-inch iron spike with gold on the head and silver on the shaft.

Safford, had the spike made, but when and by whom is unknown. Presented by Governor Safford. This month-May, A Special Hammer L. Four holes were drilled into the tie in order to accomodate the ceremonial spikes. The ceremony then commenced, emceed by wealthy Sacramento banker Edgar Mills. An invocation was offered by Reverend Dr. John Todd of Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Presentation of the spikes and ties followed.

After an arduously verbose speech, Dr. Harkness, a Sacramento newspaper publisher and editor, presented the two golden spikes to Leland Stanford. Stanford then offered a rousing speech. Coe then presented the silver plated maul, which Stanford and Durant used to gently tap the precious metal spikes, so as to leave no mark upon either the spikes, or the maul.

Immediately thereafter, the precious metal spikes and laurel wood tie were removed and replaced with a pine tie, into which three ordinary iron spikes were driven.

Rail fastening system - Wikipedia

A rail fastening system is a means of fixing rails to railroad ties North America or sleepers British Isles , Australasia , and Africa. The terms rail anchors , tie plates , chairs and track fasteners are used to refer to parts or all of a rail fastening system.

Various types of fastening have been used over the years. The earliest wooden rails were fixed to wooden sleepers by pegs through holes in the rail, or by nails. By the 18th century, cast iron rails had come into use, and also had holes in the rail itself to allow them to be fixed to a support. The first chair for a rail is thought to have been introduced in which attached to the rail on the vertical web via bolts.

By the s the first shaped rolled rails had begun to be produced initially of a T shape which required a chair to hold them; the rails were held in position by iron wedges which sometimes caused the rail to break when forced in and later by wooden wedges, which became the standard. Stevens invented the flanged 'tee' rail actually a distorted I beam , which had a flat bottom and required no chair; a similar design was the contemporary bridge rail of inverted U section with a bottom flange and laid on longitudinal sleepers ; these rails were initially nailed directly to the sleeper.

In North American practice the flanged T rail became the standard, later being used with tie-plates. Elsewhere T rails were replaced by bull head rails of a rounded 'I' or 'figure-8' appearance which still required a supporting chair.

Eventually the flanged T rail became commonplace on all the world's railways, though differences in the fixing system still exist. These are less often silver or another precious material. The rail spike has entered American popular consciousness in this manner; the driving of the Golden Spike was a key point in the development of the western seaboard in North America and was recognized as a national achievement and demonstration of progress.

Since, railroad workers have been celebrated in popular culture, including in song and verse. Most recently, a Golden Spike marked the completion of the longest transportation tunnel in the world, the Gotthard Base Tunnel , which opened 1 June Full rail service began on 11 December Its functional length is A rail spike also known as a cut spike or crampon is a large nail with an offset head that is used to secure rails and base plates to railroad ties sleepers in the track.

Robert Livingston Stevens is credited with the invention of the rail spike, [6] the first recorded use of which was in A rail spike is roughly chisel-shaped and with a flat edged point; the spike is driven with the edge perpendicular to the grain, which gives greater resistance to loosening.

When attaching tie plates the attachment is made as strong as possible, whereas when attaching a rail to tie or tie plate the spike is not normally required to provide a strong vertical force, allowing the rail some freedom of movement.

On smaller scale jobs, spikes are still driven into wooden sleepers by hammering them with a spike maul , though this manual work has been largely replaced by hydraulic tools [12] and machines, commonly called "spikers" a machine that removes spikes is called a "spike puller". A dog spike is functionally equivalent to a cut spike and is also square in horizontal section and of similar dimensions, but has a pointed penetrating end, and the rail or "plate holding" head has two lugs on either side, giving the impression of a dog's head and aiding spike removal.

Chair screws are screwed into a hole bored in the sleeper. The chair screw was first introduced in in France French tire-fond and became common in continental Europe. A dog screw is a tradename variant of the screw spike. Fang bolts or rail anchor bolts have also been used for fixing rails or chairs to sleepers. The fang bolt is a bolt inserted through a hole in the sleeper with a fanged nut that bites into the lower surface of the sleeper.

For fastening flat-bottomed rails, an upper-lipped washer can be used to grip the edge of the rail. They are more resistant to loosening by vibrations and movement of the rail. Spring spikes or elastic rail spikes [24] are used with flat-bottomed rail, baseplates and wooden sleepers. The spring spike holds the rail down and prevents tipping and also secures the baseplate to the sleeper. The spike maul , also known as a spiking hammer , is a type of sledgehammer with a long thin head which was originally used to drive spikes.

Manual hole drilling and spike or screw insertion and removal have been replaced by semi-automated or automated machines, which are driven electrically, by pneumatics, by hydraulics, or are powered by a two-stroke engine. Machines that remove spikes are called spike pullers. The earliest rail chairs , made of cast iron and introduced around , were used to fix and support cast-iron rails at their ends; [2] they were also used to join adjacent rails. In the s rolled T-shaped or single-flanged T parallel rail and I-shaped or double-flanged T parallel or bullhead rails were introduced; both required cast-iron chairs to support them.

When inserted into the chair, exposure to the wet atmosphere caused the key to expand, firmly holding the rail. In Britain they were usually on the outside. Chairs have been fixed to the sleeper using wooden spikes trenails , screws, fang-bolts or spikes. In most of the world, flat-bottomed rail and baseplates became the standard.

However, in Britain, bullhead rail-and-chairs remained in use until the middle of the twentieth century. A tie plate , baseplate or sole plate is a steel plate used on rail tracks between flanged T rail and the crossties. The tie plate increases bearing area and holds the rail to correct gauge. They are fastened to wooden ties by means of spikes or bolts through holes in the plate. The part of the plate under the rail base is tapered, setting the cant of the rail, an inward rotation from the vertical.

The usual slope is one in forty 1. The top surface of the plate has one or two shoulders that fit against the edges of the base of the rail. The double-shoulder type is currently used. Older single-shoulder types were adaptable for various rail widths, with the single shoulder positioned on the outside field side of the rails. Most plates are slightly wider on the field side, without which the plates tend to cut more into the outsides of the tie, reducing cant angle.

Many railways use large wood screws , also called lag screws , to fasten the tie plates or baseplates to the railroad ties. Tie plates came into use around the year , before which time flanged T rail was spiked directly to the ties. A variety of different types of heavy-duty clips are used to fasten the rails to the underlying baseplate, one common one being the Pandrol fastener Pandrol clip , named after its maker, which is shaped like a stubby paperclip. The newer Pandrol fastclip is applied at right angles to the rail.

Because the clip is captive, it has to be installed at the time of manufacture of the concrete sleeper. Rail anchors or anticreepers are spring steel clips that attach to the underside of the rail baseplate and bear against the sides of the sleepers to prevent longitudinal movement of the rail, either from changes in temperature or through vibration.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Screw for fixing plate to sleeper Elastomeric pad supporting rail Tension washer Rail clamp Tensioning bolt nut not shown Baseplate. Pandrol 'e-Clip' fastening. Raidabaugh, pp. Long steel rail: the railroad in American folksong. University of Illinois Press. Robert Livingston Stevens. Leading American inventors. Holt and company, New York.

Scientific American. Railroad Engineering, Volume 1. Retrieved Railway Construction. Longmans, Green, and Co. Schienenverkehrstechnik: Grundlagen der Gleistrassierung. Teubner B. Federal Railroad Administration Special bibliography: safety-related technology. National Academies. Rosenberg Publishing. Popular Mechanics. Hearst Magazines. October Popular Science. Bonnier Corporation. February Our Iron Roads: their history, construction and influences: With numerous illustrations.

Barry, John Wolfe Railway Appliances. Longmans, Green and co. Bonnett, Clifford F. Practical Railway Engineering 2nd ed. Clark, Daniel Kinnear Railway machinery: a treatise on the mechanical engineering of railways: embracing the principles and construction of rolling and fixed plant; illustrated by a series of plates on a large scale, and by numerous engravings on wood, Volume 2. Blackie and Son. Craig, Colin The Manchester Model Railway Society.

Retrieved October Railroad Construction. Ellis, Iain Ellis' British Railway Engineering Encyclopaedia. Hay, William Walter

Railroad dating spikes

Railroad dating spikes