Vintage tin robots-Best Tin Toys - Robots images | Tin toys, Vintage robots, Retro robot

By Lisa Hix — November 18th, Intruder Approaching! In this interview, robot collector Justin Pinchot gives the backstory on Japanese tin toy robots and how they reflected the postwar psyche and values of both Japan and the U. Pinchot can be reached via toyraygun. Everyone is always looking for the next big thing.

Vintage tin robots

Vintage tin robots

Vintage tin robots

Vintage tin robots

Our Fuck face choppers glass Hand Boiler demonstrates Charle. Tin Toys are for Adult Collectors and not intended for Children. Flashy Jim, which dates from aboutwalked via a wired remote. Photo courtesy Artfact. Japanese manufacturers produced this toy for Marx, but they liked it so much they made their own version, which they gave a Vintage tin robots name, colors, and packaging, but with Japanese text and characters. Auction Alerts. Beautiful Roberta the Robot walks and confidently Vintage tin robots her all metal body! I used to keep a stock of reproduction robots that were cheap that I could give to child visitors. The Radicon Robot from the late s was the first wireless, remote-control toy.

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Proto the Robot Drummer Tin Toy Our colorful Proto the Robot leans his upper body back and forth while he happliy bangs on his drums with his prototype. His head is detachable as. Our psychedelic Space Rocket is ready for blast-off. Sign up for our email newsletter. The Giant Space Robot M has come to save our planet with a jet pack on his back! Wind up the base and the 3 capsules spin higher and higher with. This is a beautifully crafted flipbook Vintage tin robots the his. The Fireman Robot is proud to protect space pioneers and astronauts. Turn on our classic Sant. Join Tin Toy Club. His body i. An amazing morphing FlipBook showing the History of Flight! Red Eyes Robot is a nice reproduction of the famous Anna martinez big tits original.

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By Lisa Hix — November 18th, Intruder Approaching! In this interview, robot collector Justin Pinchot gives the backstory on Japanese tin toy robots and how they reflected the postwar psyche and values of both Japan and the U. Pinchot can be reached via toyraygun. Everyone is always looking for the next big thing.

In the s, it was going into space. I mean, we were coming out of an era when you scrubbed your clothes on a washboard and cooled your icebox with a big block of ice. Even the first electric wristwatch, introduced around , was a marvelous innovation.

Robots fit into that drive for convenience. They were going to be the next big thing. Later, of course, we realized, that we needed robots to build cars and help us get into space. Pinchot : The worry was always that the robot would gain too much intelligence and decide what it wanted to do on its own. A big theme in early science fiction was that the robots we created would run amok.

When I was a kid, I feared robots. Toy companies deliberately made them big to amplify that fear factor. Pinchot : Well, the real rise in modern-day toy robots stems from the postwar Japanese robots. Japan was rebuilding, with U. There had been a well-established tin toy business in Japan prior to the war, so it was pretty easy for them to pick back up and continue to produce toys.

The atom bomb had a major impact on the marketing and packaging of postwar Japanese robots. It was the story of a giant, technologically advanced superpower, crushing another superpower. That whole theme got translated into space toys and robots. If you look at some of the early robot boxes, you will see robots stomping through cityscapes, causing destruction as they go—that was a metaphor for what had happened with the bombs. The U. It was the decade of Art Deco and Cubist geometry, which was infiltrating design at that time and also influenced how we imagined robots.

Pinchot : I think they realized they needed to catch up technology-wise, but really they were just trying to rebuild. They were thinking in terms of survival, but the overall influence on technology is what prompted them to design and build toy robots. After the war, most toy makers were producing clockwork toys, but the Japanese embraced batteries and motors. The timing was right. That era was ending because the Western frontier, with its cowboy-themed shows and toys, had been done to death.

Japanese tin-toy makers picked up on that immediately. Space and robot toys were indicative of the times, where all of a sudden we lived in a world with atomic bombs and rockets. It was part of a great trend that included the automation of everything from sewing and washing machines, to cars with automatic rather than manual transmissions.

It was natural to see the next frontier as a place filled with beings that would do the work of humans, and also help humankind to become more technologically advanced. Robots fit very neatly into that for a lot of reasons.

So again, why does he have a lantern? Why would he need something as primitive as a lantern to light his way? Pinchot : The whole concept is that no matter how big or overwhelming things get, you can still have power as a small, puny human. In the far reaches of outer space, where there are any number of unimaginable foes with great powers, you now have something to do your bidding, something that is equally as impressive as your enemy but under your control.

The basic premise of robots is that they are willing and able to do what we cannot or will not. They allow us to be in two places at once. The real fun comes when we cross the line and give them a personality or thinking powers. The Radicon Robot from the late s was the first wireless, remote-control toy. Naturally he made mistakes—when one character wanted gin, Robby made a bunch of bottles of gin for him, not realizing that it was a bad thing to do.

The theme of robots doing our work for us, helping us, and really being an extension of us will never go away. They are always tools for us to get what we want. And best of all, we got to control them. But if you give a toy to a kid that allows him some modicum of control over his life, guess what? They get to drive. Pinchot : I think they did. I may be wrong on this, but I believe they were popular because the Japanese liked American values and culture.

They were starting to get tuned-in to our culture and, in reflecting that, robots were popular in Japan as well. Japanese manufacturers produced this toy for Marx, but they liked it so much they made their own version, which they gave a different name, colors, and packaging, but with Japanese text and characters.

They took a lot of our designs and produced them for their domestic consumption. There were not huge numbers of these tin Japanese robots because Japan is a small country compared to the U.

Today, those Japanese-issue toys are often more coveted, at least in America. There was another one that might have been designed before the war, but released shortly after, called Atomic Robot Man.

After the war, the small battery-operated motor was devised, and the Japanese were the first to put them in toys. Most toy makers in other countries were still producing clockwork toys, but the Japanese embraced batteries and small motors.

They were the only game in town as far as that was concerned. They innovated that type of toy, and it became very popular. In many ways, the Japanese toys of the s were updates of automatons from the s, which were windup toys.

They could walk, but they were also very detailed. Take a mechanical fortune teller, for instance—her eyes would open and close, her head would nod, and her hands would move. The problem was these toys were horrendously expensive. The Japanese were able to affect that same motion much more cheaply with battery-operated motors. So they were producing something that previously had been very expensive but all of a sudden was very affordable.

They were great toys. Chinese toy production eventually toppled Japan as the number-one toy producer. Pinchot : They could walk and you controlled them with a remote control battery box connected to the toy by a wire.

If it was a clockwork toy, you would wind it up, turn on its switch, and it would walk. With battery-op robots, they not only walked forward but backward as well, and in some cases they had a whole host of other functions; maybe a spinning wheel in its head, or ears that moved, or lighted eyes—add lights to anything and kids go crazy.

It was a bit of technology that kids could actually play with and relate to. Prior to that, technology was exclusive to adults with their new fangled washing machines, cars, and freezers. Actually, the very first wireless remote-control toy was a Japanese robot called Radicon Robot. Pinchot : Yes, but it was simple and was operated by a hand crank.

The toy took batteries, but only to make the eyes light up; the walking and talking action were generated by a hand-cranked wired remote. A lot of different Japanese robots came out after Robert and they improved upon the idea a hundred fold. For example, Masudaya had the Gang of Five, which were large, tin lithographed, skirted robots just like Robert, except they were all tin and fully battery-operated.

Robert was cool, but he was somewhat crude compared to what you had in the Japanese robots. They were much more advanced and much more interesting for kids. If you asked a kid to choose between a plastic Robert the Robot and a tin, lithographed, brightly colored, eyes-lighting, noise-making, bump-and-go action Japanese robot, the Japanese tin robot wins every time. The tin Japanese-made toys were much more popular. We would produce something in plastic, and you would see it a year or two later in tin lithograph and battery-operated.

Obviously we had access to tin, but the process and labor were too expensive. It was easier for U. So you had companies like Marx and Cragstan, which was an American company that sold only Japanese stuff, commissioning the Japanese to manufacture U.

I thought they were kind of cheesy. They rust. I thought it was junk. I wanted Art Deco pressed-steel toys that were American made. Then, suddenly, there was this big sea change for me, a big paradigm shift.

I got the design, I got the whole impact of it. I understood the value of the design, the rarity, the uniqueness. But I had to evolve into that as a collector. I just lost my mind. It was so cute and so unusual. I had never seen anything like it.

I put the word out that I was looking for robots and started collecting voraciously. I had Hot Wheels from when I was a kid, so I started collecting those.

Our colorful Proto the Robot leans his upper body back and forth while he happliy bangs on his drums with his prototype.. Classic tin toy wind up robots are reproductions of the originals from Japan. With a key wind he walks with pins under his foot.. His arms sway as he walks. This bright red robot wears a large fire hat, dual.. She walks forward with a determined strut. This bright blue Lilliput Robot is a unique version of the original tin toy robot.

Vintage tin robots

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His body i.. Catapult the Firefly to incredible heights with the slingshot launcher. As the toy falls, the fins twirl in the ai..

Our rocket set includes 4 yellow foam r.. The most masterful robot creation! Our large, dark grey Smoking Robot is an exacting replica of the Japanese original by.. Let Sputnik hold your memos, cards and photos on its five exten.. Our adorable Snoopy Rocket light keeps watch all night and glows in your room with a flickering rocket flame! Just plug.. Just point the illuminating rocket wand onto a wa.. An amazing morphing FlipBook showing the History of Flight! This is a beautifully crafted flipbook illustrating the his..

Wind up our white Fridge Rover and it magically crawls up and on your Refrigerator. Our cute Moon Buggy demonstrates the.. Beautiful Roberta the Robot walks and confidently struts her all metal body! Wind up Roberta's hot pink body and g.. Our beautiful glass Hand Boiler demonstrates Charle.. Our beautiful flying saucer has traveled from Neptune.

Wind up our all-tin UFO and watch it move forward, then stop and.. Back to Basics. Clear Filters For Ages. Shop by Price. Join Tin Toy Club. Sign up for our email newsletter. No Spam, just fun stuff! Click to Join. Classic Wind Up Robots. Product Compare 0. Show: 25 30 50 75 Martian Invader Run for your life! Add to Cart. Add to Wish List. Compare this Product. M is our largest windup tin.. This special editon,.. Watch Santa workout by climbing 40 inches of golden chain to practice for his big delivery day!

Turn on our classic Sant.. His t.. It's the Santa Claus Robot! Some people say, Santa must have some help to deliver all of those presents on Christmas Eve.. Dome Head Roby Robot is a reproduction of the famous Japanese original. Wind him up and watch his sparkling face as he m.. Is the X Explorer protected in his huge blue and red astronaut suit?

He walks forward viewing an alien planet and com.. Our colorful Proto the Robot leans his upper body back and forth while he happliy bangs on his drums with his prototype.. With funny.. Red Eyes Robot is a nice reproduction of the famous Japanese original. With a key wind he walks with pins under his foot.. Our colorful ROBO the Clown leans his upper body back and forth while he happliy bangs on his drum with his metal arms. Our wind-up blue Smoking Robot is an replica of the Japanese masterpiece by Yonezawa.

With the proportions of the batter.. Our wind-up black Smoking Robot is an replica of the Japanese masterpiece by Yonezawa. The "Smoking Spaceman" was design.. The High Wheel "Gear" Robot was the transitional robot from all-tin to plastics. With his clear chest, you can see 6 mov.. The Fireman Robot is proud to protect space pioneers and astronauts. This bright red robot wears a large fire hat, dual.. Remember the Space Race to the Moon with our classic wind-up Astronaut tin toy! Our Astronaut Blue Robot has a hum..

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King and Country toy soldiers. View-Masters and reels. Vintage Toy Robots Related Categories. Auction Alerts. The s was a particularly good decade to be a toy robot. The world was going through something of an awakening, as both the horrors and marvels of technology were revealed.

Along with the shock of the first nuclear bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in , the looming Space Race inspired hope for the wild possibilities of humans traveling and living among the stars. Naturally, science and technology—and in particular that related

Vintage tin robots