Vintage tool cleaning-Cleaning vintage tools etiquette - The Garage Journal Board

They sure don't make tools like this anymore, you muse as you turn the old jack plane in your hands. Thousands of planing passes have smoothed its wooden sole. Years of grime obscure the wood's once-satin finish. The tote bears the crinkles of old age, and rust clings to the metal. Decades ago the tool was a beautiful thing -- can it be again?

Vintage tool cleaning

Vintage tool cleaning

Vintage tool cleaning

Send a private message to ZRX For wooden handles and knobs in average to good condition, I use an all natural concoction Vintage tool cleaning on linseed oil, turpentine, and vinegar LTVamong other secret ingredients. These Teen masterbate gallery often contain Vintage tool cleaning, which penetrates the grain and can't be removed or recoated with another finish. Hard cases will have to be stripped with paint stripper. Whenever I see someone using a claw hammer for mechanical work, I assume he is a retard. This dries to the touch, helps retard rust, and looks better than oil or wax. Send a private message to justin

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Filter reviews. It's not a good idea tpol put your moulders in the oven for the ageing process. Vintage tool cleaning of old hand saws with slightly rusted blades and wood handles. The following tips will help you stop a rust problem before it starts. Buffing is an extremely dirty job, make sure you wear protective gear - gloves, safety goggles and a good dust mask. All you want is the grinder motor with an empty spindle. Staff were great, airport pick ups and drops offs Vintage tool cleaning smooth. These are all quality, USA made tools, showin To fashion the handle, Harrison bergeron climax used Vintqge simple hand tools: cross-cut saw, files, and a rotary tool. That is why dealers often put the pieces that they don't want to be associated with in auctions. Just look at how black the white rag that you using for the wax will turn. So make sure you understand this: The tool is more or less clean before it hits the buffer. Steel wool is available in eight grades of coarseness, ranging from superfine, No.

Using old tools in the workshop is an amazing experience.

  • I was told air would be fixed tomorrow for 3 nights.
  • Nothing frustrates me more than buying a dirty old tool for a lot of money only to find it broken or fixed when I clean it.
  • He is the author or editor of over a dozen books on technology, DIY, and geek culture.

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Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today! If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us. Sponsored Links Register now to hide all advertisements. Cleaning vintage tools etiquette. I'm pretty new here and I did do a bit of a search, but didn't find much.

What is the general consensus on cleaning vintage hand tools - wrenches, sockets, ratchets, etc? Or is there any agreement on anything? Clean the rust and grease off. None of the above - leave them as is, as found.

Who gives a crap? What do you guys and gals do? Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette. I only clean the rust and grease. The ultrasonic cleaner really gets gunk out of tiny places very well. HF ultrasonic cleaner. After cleaning, if they need rust removed, they get a bath in Evapo-rust. This stuff works great. That might seem expensive, but I've had the same gallon for about a year and it's still going strong.

Given the fact that I plan to use the tools, I only clean the rust and grease off. I think its fun to have a box full of different brands, most that other people in the shop have never heard of. I would consider all them to be as good as Snap-On, minus the warranty, and a lot cheaper.

Its also easier to keep track of my tools. I use light oil with a brass brush followed with fine steel wool, I like to clean up the rust a bit with the goal of preserving the overall patina and leaving any of the original plating intact. Find More Posts by PaulsGarage.

I can vouch for Evapo-Rust. I use it on all rusty tools. I've been known to wire brush a tool or two don't tell Bolster On occasion I've used a Scotchbrite pad to get things real purty. Takes some talent to use that wheel though. You can make a shiny mess real quick. I like the idea of using an ultrasonic cleaner, Stephen can you post some before and after pics for those of us too lazy to search old threads on the topic?

Originally Posted by PaulsGarage. Originally Posted by Plombob. Originally Posted by aussiek Why do I keep clicking on 's threads? Like a bad car wreck you just have to look. Originally Posted by ez-duzit. Originally Posted by Lookin4'67Galaxieconv. Evapo-rust has gotten so expensive, I use it selectively these days. I'll go to steel wool and the wire wheel first. I use paint thinner to clean off grime. Let sockets soak in a jar for about an hour and the grime just falls to the bottom.

For rust, I use a mixture of lemon juice and water. Let them soak for about 24 hours and the rust wipes right off. This might not be cost-effective if you have to buy the lemons. I've got a tree in my back yard with lemons on it year-round. I use vinegar to remove rust, wire wheel on my bench grinder to "clean up" and normal oil from hands and working with the tool to lube. Love my mix of new and old tools. Originally Posted by Chuck Whenever I see someone using a claw hammer for mechanical work, I assume he is a retard.

After that I just put mine away after wiping with a slightly oiled rag. If they are noticeably greasy I wipe them off with a shop rag an put them away. I live near the ocean and tools will rust quickly if you get all of the grease and oil off them. The salt water boat mechanics tools are usually covered in grease and grime around here to keep the rust away.

Last edited by Shadowdog; at PM. I try to return them to "as new" condition, or even better in some cases. I don't get down on "patina" - to me that word translates into "neglect". I just use a wirebrush or wheel, sandpaper and soaking in some rust removal liquid. I usually start by wiping things down with parts and brake cleaner before I start with the wire wheel or sandpaper, just to keep from gunking up the paper or brush.

To me they just need to be clean enough so that I can see what size wrench, socket etc. I also see no problem in taking heat, grinders or welders to old tools to make them more fit for a job.

Same goes for welding flat stock and square tubing to wrenches and sockets to make striking wrenches. I have some tools that are off limits for these kinds of frankentool experiments. But some tools are just waiting their time to become donors. Thread Tools. All times are GMT The time now is AM. User Name. Remember Me? Cleaning vintage tools etiquette I'm pretty new here and I did do a bit of a search, but didn't find much. Send a private message to B17E Find More Posts by B17E Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette I only clean the rust and grease.

Send a private message to SMKS. Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette Given the fact that I plan to use the tools, I only clean the rust and grease off. Send a private message to Ritter4. Find More Posts by Ritter4. Posts: Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette I use light oil with a brass brush followed with fine steel wool, I like to clean up the rust a bit with the goal of preserving the overall patina and leaving any of the original plating intact.

Send a private message to PaulsGarage. Visit PaulsGarage's homepage! Posts: 3, Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette I can vouch for Evapo-Rust. Send a private message to Plombob. Find More Posts by Plombob.

Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette I like the idea of using an ultrasonic cleaner, Stephen can you post some before and after pics for those of us too lazy to search old threads on the topic? Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette Quote: Originally Posted by PaulsGarage I like the idea of using an ultrasonic cleaner, Stephen can you post some before and after pics for those of us too lazy to search old threads on the topic? Originally Posted by aussiek Why do I keep clicking on 's threads?

Originally Posted by ez-duzit Unsubscribed. Send a private message to Lookin4'67Galaxieconv. Find More Posts by Lookin4'67Galaxieconv. Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette Quote: Originally Posted by Lookin4'67Galaxieconv Evapo-rust has gotten so expensive, I use it selectively these days.

Re: Cleaning vintage tools etiquette I use paint thinner to clean off grime. Send a private message to justin

If you try hard enough, you will break the arms, and likely strip some threads as well. The result was a tool that cuts perfectly, taking long, silky-smooth shavings with every pass. The finest grade, which comes as a white pad, can be used with wax to clean tools without harming the surface and patina. For collectors, this approach is often not satisfying because of the obvious disadvantages of displaying items with unsightly repairs. It's not a good idea to put your moulders in the oven for the ageing process. Japanese 5.

Vintage tool cleaning

Vintage tool cleaning

Vintage tool cleaning

Vintage tool cleaning

Vintage tool cleaning

Vintage tool cleaning. Watch Next

Well, no more excuses! Here we offer two ways to quickly and easily bust that rust. Choose an effective scrubbing material when dealing with light to moderate surface rust problems. Deeper rust issues may require more than just muscle, but this physical solution is a good first step. Start by cleaning the rusted tools in soapy water to remove dirt and grease. Then, rinse the tools with water and dry thoroughly. For light rust, scrub the surface with a scouring pad, sandpaper, or steel wool.

Always start with the coarsest abrasive to remove the built-up rust and pockmarks, then switch to a finer grit to smooth out the grooves caused by the coarse grit.

For more serious rust problems, coat the surface of the tools with kerosene to function as a cutting lubricant. Wait several minutes.

Then, attach a wire wheel to an electric drill to buff away the stubborn rust. Finish off with fine-grain sandpaper to remove any leftover residue. If the surface rust is gone, your work is done. But if the problem persists, you may need a stronger chemical solution.

This mild acid gets right into joints and crevices to penetrate the problem areas, making it especially good at removing rust in tight spaces and hard-to-clean spots. Maybe the former owner cleaned them years ago, maybe time was kind to them and they aged gracefully but if they haven't I sure want them clean enough to be sold to a lady in white gloves.

This is rule one and the only one you need to remember. No matter how much you clean brass or wood with a soft cloth, in a few years time nobody will be able to tell the difference. Slow Start. For commercial operators like myself, cleaning is not the preferred option. This alone makes sure that I clean only a small fraction of my tools. Other restraints are just as important. Why shine up a set of moulding planes that look perfect apart from a bit of dust? Wipe it off with a cloth and some mineral turps.

From Turps to Paint Stripper. Whether you do your laundry, remove stains or restore a priceless 15th century painting, you always start with the harmless stuff first. No need to king hit a bit of dust with paint stripper when a wet rag will do the job. I found that nothing really beats mineral turpentine. I go through gallons of the stuff. I use a fairly large old baking tin for most of my cleaning jobs. Wooden planes I clean with turps and triple or quadruple O steel wool.

For most of the wooden tools this is all you need. Let it dry and apply some linseed oil or good quality furniture wax and rub off any excess with a soft cloth. There are some great products on the market, usually called buffing wax or similar, they work well without much effort. Linseed oil is the traditional and cheapest method of protecting wood. It's available in different degrees of purity.

They all work ok, especially if you thin them down with mineral turps. Key is not to use too much and wipe off all the excess. However, I feel it is time to break with tradition and use modern wax or finer oil products instead. Regular and prolonged use of linseed oil on wooden planes over 20 or 30 years changes the aging process and the colour of the wood. Linseed treated beech planes tend to redden over time. I find it NOT all that suitable for humid or wet conditions as we have in Queensland.

If you apply too much it will leave the wood sticky or bleed it out over long periods, attracting mould and dust that leaves your tool with a dull, dark surface.

Make sure you don't over-apply any product you use as a finish on your tools. Metal planes are a lot harder to clean with steel wool and turps. Take them apart first. Most Stanley type planes have japanned beds. Some tool guys swear they can copy japanning but I have to see a convincing job yet. I clean it with turps and steel wool, paint splatters I remove with a knife-point.

You can use black paint for a touch up, experience will teach you how much is too much. Treat the frog in the same way. The sole and sides are a completely different matter.

I use a blunt knife or scraper to get rid of excess rust and some fine grade wet or dry abrasive paper. Same treatment for the cutter, the back iron and the lever cap. If the nickel plating is ok don't wreck it with abrasive paper. Most of the times it's not. I prefer to remove all the loose flakes. English infill planes are a bit trickier, they combine wood and steel or iron. Special care is required when working the lines between the different materials. So make sure you understand this: The tool is more or less clean before it hits the buffer.

Clean with care and buff with measure. I remember the horror I felt when Reg Eaton told me years ago that he buffed his tools. This guy invented tool dealing, how could he! Most people associate buffing with a grinder, wire brush or similar torture instrument. Not even close. All you want is the grinder motor with an empty spindle. Attach a soft loose cloth buffing wheel. Stitched buffers are ok with steel but are too hard for wood and soft metals.

I use a motor with two spindles and a hard stitched cloth on the left and a soft one on the right. Put a small amount of buffing compound on the cloth and get buffing. You can buy any number of different compound sticks for different applications. Some people use wax or their own home-made brew. Larger diameters are great for bigger surfaces but useless if you need to clean the bed of a block plane, the inside of a lever cap or any other fiddly bits.

Keep all the used wheels and change them at different stages so that you have a good selection with different diameters available.

Claening Stanley planes

Using old tools in the workshop is an amazing experience. When tools are properly restored, they are often just as good if not better than many products made today, and the history that accompanies them is so inspiring.

I love using old tools previously owned by a maker whose skill level I will likely never reach. I imagine their lives, their hands, the pieces they built. Using antique tools to build furniture that breaks the Ikea mold, furniture that will last not only my whole life, but will likely outlive my grandchildren as well is a really incredible feeling. Antique tools can often be acquired and restored fairly cheaply, but depending on the condition in which the tool was found, the restoration process can take a long time.

Here is a crash course in restoring old tools using vinegar. There are many methods, many of which I've tried, but this is the one I used most. I try to use as many natural or organic products as possible and leave the heavy chemicals outside the shop because I never know who is going to wander into my shop- kitties, bunnies, chickens and ducks are frequent guests. I tried electrolysis, but it wasn't my favorite because I didn't see much of an improvement on the vinegar process and I had to constantly be worried about one of my critters getting into the electrolysis room and dipping a paw in the water- byebye baby.

I got most of my basic tool set in one big lot on ebay and cleaned, sharpened, and rehandled around blades of various kinds within a few weeks. It was a huge task but ended up being totally worth it because I had a TON of practice not only in restoration, but also in grinding and sharpening.

I was taught to do both freehand which saved me a TON of time in the long run. If you don't already do this and have some crappier items which you wouldn't mind grinding down a bit, I would highly recommend giving freehand grinding and sharpening a shot. I usually soak and work on small batches of tools at once because it is necessary you clean the metal immediately after removing it from the vinegar.

It would be a very good day if I could restore 5 things in one day without getting carpel tunnel, so I try to plan accordingly. What you don't want is to be forced to leave tools in the vinegar too long due to time constraints. If a tool is in particularly horrible shape or will just be a every day user with little lasting value beyond that, I will save myself a few hours and skip the vinegar and go straight to the wire brush on my grinder.

This is fast and painless unless the chisel slips and hits you in the face , but also makes the tool lose value and beauty in about 2 minutes flat. The only way I ever justify doing this is if I wouldn't otherwise restore the tool.

I had a gouge sitting in my garbage pile for a few weeks because it was so badly rusted I didn't think it would hold a good edge anymore. One day I was cleaning some welds on my wire wheel and I just grabbed it too. I discovered in the process that it was actually a pretty valuable chisel, but it was already too late. I got a handle on it, sharpened it up, and now it is one of my main carving tools.

Having a quick and dirty method to go to saved that chisel's life and now it is being daily used, so there's that. The next two steps involve water and vinegar, both of which have potential to damage wooden handles and other wooden parts of your tool, so remove them if you can. If you can't, try to keep them away from the water and definitely keep them away from the vinegar, or it will oxidize the wood and turn it black.

Using dishsoap, water, and a scrubbie not the metal kind , try to get as much of the loose dirt off as possible. If the piece is especially grimy, an overnight soak might help get some of the gunk off.

Dry the piece off well and immediately either oil all parts or immerse in vinegar or the metal will begin to rust. I put all the metal parts in a plastic bin to soak in the vinegar anywhere from a few hours to 48 hours. Do not leave in the vinegar for much longer than that or the vinegar will begin to eat the metal as well. Gloves are not necessary at this stage because the vinegar is basically harmless, but I have pretty sensitive skin, so I try to wear gloves through the whole process.

Whenever I find extra small latex free gloves, I buy them in bulk because my size is surprisingly hard to find. Every few hours, take the tools out of the vinegar starting with the thinnest, smallest pieces and examine the progress. A few wipes with a towel will let you know how much of the rust is gone.

I have found it is always better to "undercook" rather than "overcook" at this stage because early on I literally dissolved a few sets of calipers I was trying to restore. Not funny at the time, very funny now. When you are satisfied with the work the vinegar has done on your behalf, take the metal parts out, one by one and dry them well with paper towels. Then immediately coat with oil, citrus wax cleaner, or anything that is going to stop them from beginning to "flash rust" which can happen literally within minutes of removing the tool from the vinegar.

I usually use mineral oil because it is so cheap. I want to be very careful here to remove the dirt, grime, and rust, but nothing more. Especially on handplanes, you want to be very careful here to keep as much of the "japanning" or black paint on the interior of the plane body and frog as possible.

Using harsh metal brushes, sandpaper, or hastily using the dentist's tools here can scratch the metal's surface, remove the japanning, and cause you all kinds of headaches later on. On surfaces that don't have japanning, I use steel wool and brass brushes liberally. People often ask when they are "done" with this part. As with everything, I think you are done when you are happy with the results you have achieved. Some people care way more than others about this part, but in the end, it's your tool, your shop, your time, your effort.

The main purpose of this whole process is to remove rust that will endanger the lifetime of your tool. When finished with this step, unless it's a handplane, generously oil the tool, coat with paste wax or Boeshield, and reassemble. You're done. If the wooden components are not damaged or in especially rough shape, I like to leave them how they are.

If they need to be sanded, epoxied or reshaped, that's another article. I remove old paint and other grime by carefully rubbing the tool with steel wool and Hornsby's Citrus Wax Cleaner. A lot of times an overnight soak in oil followed by a coat of paste wax applied with steel wool will do wonders to brighten them up and make them really pop again. Handplanes need to be dead flat on their bottoms and sides to work properly.

Again, there are many ways of doing this, but I start by reassembling the plane and making sure the blade is recessed all the way into the body of the plane, not protruding from the bottom at all. Then I use spray glue and sheets of sandpaper pasted to granite or melamine and begin planing across the sandpaper with the tool as if I were working wood. I like to start with grit sandpaper because if the plane sole is already fairly flat, I won't have to work through the grits again to smooth out the scratches I made by starting with too low a grit.

If a lot of metal needs to be removed, I will move down to grit, plane until there is an even scratch pattern along the whole sole of the plane, or very nearly so, and then move up the grits to remove the scratches. I do the same thing on the sides of the plane and then take a few passes on the last grit with the plane tilted slightly to sand off the sharp corner edges I have just created by flattening the three sides of the plane.

When done with this, coat all metal parts in paste wax or spray with Boesheild. The next step is to oil up the moving parts of the tool using 3 in 1 or your favorite oil, sharpen the blade, reassemble the tool, and test the plane out. This part also has a few intricacies that would warrant another article- making sure the frog mounts squarely to the plane bed, making sure the chip breaker mates properly with the blade, scootching the frog forward or backward for fine or medium use, etc etc etc, but for the sake of this article, we are going to assume all of that stuff is working great.

Also, as I have previously mentioned, sharpening is another article as well, and one I'm not anxious to write because there are so many methods and so many volumes already written about it that you basically need to just do some research, pick a method, learn it, practice it and stick to it.

That said though, for your plane or chisel to work, the back of the blade needs to be dead flat, a straight bevel needs to be ground on the front, and the blade needs to be honed and stropped to whatever level you want to take it to. I will share a secret here that, if properly used, will save your hands, your stones, and a lot of time in the flattening process.

Do this only if your blade is very pitted or extremely out of true. Mount a belt sander sandpaper belt side up in your bench vise.

Practice when the tool is off laying the topmost inch or so of your blade dead flat over the paper. Then turn the tool on and be very careful to put even pressure all around and get it as flat as possible here. Next, move to flattening on your coarsest stone or whatever method you use.

Using even pressure on a diamond plate or your stone, rub the blade back and forth until an even scratch pattern can be seen across the entire back of the blade where the bevel meets it at the tip. Move up through the stones until the blade back has a mirror polish. You should be able to see your reflection when you are finished. After a few minutes at each stage of this process, color the whole back of the chisel where you are working with black sharpie.

Rub a few strokes on the stone and see what of the chisel markings is being removed. Adjust your strokes and pressure accordingly until a few strokes on each stone will remove the sharpie marks entirely, especially at the edge near the tip. If you are afraid of using the belt sander but the blade has very obvious high spots, you can also use a dremel tool with a sandpaper or grinder attachment to grind away those specific high spots.

Be careful, however, not to get too excited with the dremel and dish the back, or you will have to take even more material off to achieve a flat back. Again, practicing first using a more disposable blade and a sharpie will be helpful because it is, at first, a little difficult to remove material evenly. Practice makes perfect.

Or in my case- close enough for woodwork. After sharpening, wipe dry with a paper towel then give the blade a wipe with a tack cloth soaked in jojoba or mineral oil. Jojoba oil is better in my opinion than mineral oil because it is dryer and there is less oily residue left on the wood. Another benefit of the jojoba oil is that it seems to be less "sticky" than mineral oil when it comes to sawdust, and, as I'm sure you know, sawdust is every woodworker's enemy because it traps water and rusts your tool.

Once the tool is restored, I coat the entire thing wood and all with a light coat of citrus paste wax, car Turtle wax, or my new favorite, Boeshield. After each use, I blow the entire tool off with my air gun be careful not to drop it on the concrete and shatter one of your favorite new planes while doing this Blades that have the screw-on chip breaker need to be checked on occasion to be sure there are no shavings trapped in between the blade and the breaker, because those little buggers are sure to rust your blades in a flash.

As far as your power tools go, I'd keep all the cast iron waxed up with paste wax or Boesheild. About once a year I go in with some steel wool to get any rust that's forming and then give it a new coat of wax. Sometimes my cats come in from the rain and lay on the table saw, so I've had to use sandpaper to get a couple of the worse rust spots out, but as long as they get re-waxed right away they are good to go for a long time.

I don't want to duplicate or pretend to be an expert on subjects others have covered in great detail. Click here for a list of some of my favorite sites, articles and topics. Restoring old tools. Step 1: remove wooden components The next two steps involve water and vinegar, both of which have potential to damage wooden handles and other wooden parts of your tool, so remove them if you can.

Step 2: clean thoroughly Using dishsoap, water, and a scrubbie not the metal kind , try to get as much of the loose dirt off as possible. Step 4: examine your progress Every few hours, take the tools out of the vinegar starting with the thinnest, smallest pieces and examine the progress. Step 5: protect against flash rust When you are satisfied with the work the vinegar has done on your behalf, take the metal parts out, one by one and dry them well with paper towels.

Vintage tool cleaning