Violent marvel characters-Who's the most ruthless violent Marvel character? - Marvel - Comic Vine

Once upon a time, Marvel heroes existed to combat the violent people of the world. They have no qualms about using guns, knives, flamethrowers, or good old-fashioned super strength to get their point across in the most violent way possible. What really makes a hero violent, though? A tendency to murder? What separates some violent superheroes is their willingness to go a step beyond the norm, or even just a particular fondness for the routine methods of violence.

Violent marvel characters

As we've seen, sometimes wearing a mask can bring out the more savage side of a crime-fighter. The question Violent marvel characters, do you count them as heroes? Close one. He is arguably one of the most powerful Marvel heroes in existence, and is certainly Violent marvel characters of the most violent. He's free to indulge his sadistic nature by carving a path of destruction through his enemies and contracts. So you have to ask, who was the true bad influence in Venom's various relationships? It was something the symbiote continued to do even after forcibly leaving Eddie Brock. Related articles on Writeups. Gone were the consequences of the "real-world" characters i.

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April 25, Covering the hottest movie and TV topics that fans want. Mark Verheiden. However, he is crazy and sometimes that can lead to smart plans and other times Suck choad can be just so crazy that there is no way to truly attack him head on. One of the most popular characters Viopent the show is Michonne. Blade is unashamedly R-Rated and has all the cgaracters language and glorious violence you could ask for, and the opening is just a teaser. Punisher has long ceased trying to justify his actions. Retrieved December 18, He is afraid of bats, Violent marvel characters he becomes the Batman to marvle what others may fear. So he will take out tanks, Violent marvel characters kill people if he has to. Retrieved December 7,

Two things can usually be expected when reading a comic book story: a hero and a villain.

  • The Character: Vietnam vet Frank Castle has killed more than 4, people during his tour of duty in his own personal war against crime.
  • Death in comics.
  • Whether they come from Marvel, DC Comics, or somewhere else
  • Most superheroes solve their problems with violence.

Two things can usually be expected when reading a comic book story: a hero and a villain. Meanwhile, we think the hero does the other thing: saves the day with non-violent righteousness. But that isn't always the case. He first appeared in "Incredible Hulk" , bearing his claws and boldly snarling at the Hulk, so a little violent streak was to be expected. While the next issue didn't actually contain an epic fight, Wolverine would more than make up for that lacklustre appearance over the next few years.

He's certainly no stranger to violence, but where others like Captain America might show a little restraint, you'll get no such mercy from Wolverine. Considering he's more than a hundred years old, it's been speculated that he's killed thousands throughout his time on this earth, on top of the multitudes he's killed in the pages of comics. She swings around two Okinawan sai, she's mastered a wide variety of weapons and she's a trained ninja assassin, so she's bound to have some blood on her hands.

Elektra's violent nature stems from quite a dark past. In Marvel's "Elektra: Assassin" 1 written by Miller , it was revealed that she'd been self-harming as a means to cope with haunting voices and doubts over vague memories of abuse. She also witnessed her father's death, she's been killed multiple times and there's doubt as to whether the psychotherapy that was supposed to give her some sense of stability ever actually worked. That anger and turmoil manifests in the violence, blood and gore she leaves behind her in her comic series, like the slew of S.

D agents she slaughtered though had no memory of , for example, before killing a hitwoman and the former S. Don't be fooled by the eleven year old girl you see before you. Because of her violent nature, that's not always easy. Next on the list is the Thanagarian with an ancient soul, bashing his way through his enemies with his Nth metal armor and various medieval weapons. He first appeared in "Flash Comics" 1 written by Gardner Fox and illustrated by Harry Lampert and while over the years the DC universe has changed quite a lot, Hawkman's terrible violent streak hasn't.

He's got quite a temper and it shows in the mess he leaves behind. Even in his appearance in 's "All Star Comics" 1, he was seen defeating the sorcerer Trygg by destroying his lair with an explosion while the sorcerer and his assistant Beldame were still inside. This is one superhero any villain definitely wouldn't want to cross, because unlike most heroes, there's a huge chance villains will not walk away. It's undeniable that Hawkman has little to no regard for human life, which often puts him into conflict with members of the Justice League, at one point battling Green Arrow due to differing views on how best to handle villains.

If you thought that was harsh, just take a look at this next DC superhuman claiming to fight for justice. Son of Rameses II, this ancient Egyptian dictator was imbued with the powers of the gods by the high priest, Shazam. Betrayed and corrupted by the high priest's own daughter, Teth-Adam became Black Adam and was buried, only to be discovered and unleashed upon the world a thousand years later by the unknowing archaeologist, Theo Adam.

Black Adam does not shy away from violence; in fact, he constantly uses it to intimidate his foes or make a point. That earned him the distrust of almost every superhero in the "52" series, after he very literally tore the villain Terra Man in half in front of the press as an example of his stance and by association his country, Kahndaq's position on crime.

That's not even the worst of it. While enraged by the death of his beloved wife, Isis and her brother, Osiris, he massacred the nation of Bialya, just for being associated with the forces that stole the lives of his family.

Like all superheroes, Midnighter fights for justice and peace. What sets him apart from the rest is that he genuinely enjoys the violence and bloodshed in fighting crime. He was first introduced in "Stormwatch Vol.

He has limited precognitive abilities a computer in his brain analyzes every fight he gets into, telling him all the different ways to win , he's incredibly fast and strong.

Many have said that he's basically Batman, but with superpowers After the implied assault and sodomy committed against Apollo by The Commander, Apollo and Midnighter take down The Americans in the most brutal way possible.

So don't cross him. Within the realm of DC's Batman-esque characters without the limit of his one rule, we find Red Hood with Jason Todd beneath the crimson helmet. Even when he was Robin, Jason was angry and lived in a moral grey area. He fought for justice, certainly, but his kind differed greatly from that of his mentor, Batman. This was most notable in "Batman" written by Jim Starlin and illustrated by Mark Bright, Steve Mitchell and Anthony Tollin , wherein Robin hunts down and sees the murder of a serial rapist who had diplomatic immunity.

In other comics, he's seen wielding guns and trying to hunt down the Bat-family, essentially because Bruce never avenged Todd's death, his return from which drove him insane. Generally, though, having taken advice and resources from Talia Al Ghul, Todd's aim is to strike a more adamant fear into the hearts of Gotham's underworld, and he has rejoined Batman's most-trusted ranks as an ally.

With his tendency to solve problems with blood, though, he's best described by Ra's Al Ghul who called him a curse upon the world. As we've seen, sometimes wearing a mask can bring out the more savage side of a crime-fighter. That's essentially what happened to Rorschach, as we can see when he refers to the ever changing ink blots as his real face in Alan Moore's "Watchmen" series, published by DC.

The best evidence of his extremely violent streak is when he's locked in prison, surrounded by people he put away and every single one of them wants to kill him.

One of them tries and immediately gets hot oil thrown in his face, while another is outright murdered. Rorschach wasn't the only ultra-violent superhero in the "Watchmen" series. Eddie Blake, also known as The Comedian, is guilty of quite a lot, some of which wasn't done in the name of justice or doing the right thing. In fact, in "Before Watchmen: Minutemen" 1 , it was revealed that before becoming a costumed vigilante, Blake had a long record of criminal activity, none of which he seems to be trying to make up for.

Then there's the reason he was kicked out of the Minutemen group: after a photo shoot, he tries to get Sally Jupiter to sleep with him. When she rejects his advances, he violently assaults her, though he's stopped and beaten by Hooded Justice. This vile character isn't part of superhero team because he believes in it, but because he loves the violence that goes with it.

This is one 'hero' who needed to die. Marvel's Hulk is the embodiment of pure rage. However, he just wants to be left alone. Red Hulk on the other hand, isn't as simple. We find that he became Red Hulk with the aid of A. M and Intelligencia in order to fight Hulk. Unlike Hulk, Ross maintains his mind, although that doesn't seem to help.

Thaddeus Ross is generally just a violent person. When his daughter was getting married to Bruce Banner, seemingly cured of the Hulk in "Incredible Hulk" written by John Byrne with artwork by Byrne, Keith Williams and Andy Yanchus , he entered the venue wielding guns and making threats.

When Rick Jones attempted to stop him, Ross shot Jones don't worry, there's a happy ending there. As Red Hulk, Ross has destroyed an entire S. D helicarrier with everyone on board; he's even punched Uatu the Watcher in the face, just for trying to watch his fight against the original Hulk!

Yes, he's an Avenger, but a hero? Not exactly. Though he was introduced to us as Spider-Man's greatest foe in "Amazing Spider-Man" , Venom was more crazed and misguided, rather than actually evil. Aside from fighting the wall-crawler, Eddie Brock used the power of the symbiote to become a lethal protector of the innocent. It was something the symbiote continued to do even after forcibly leaving Eddie Brock.

As an anti-hero, the monstrous symbiote found a way to save people and sate its appetite for blood. While Venom has worked with many superheroes to save lives, it's pretty safe to say that Venom has destroyed or ended more lives than he's saved.

Interestingly, the symbiote's species -- the Klyntar -- were recently revealed as being not just non-violent, but actual protectors in space, though easily manipulated once attached to the destructive power of the human ego.

So you have to ask, who was the true bad influence in Venom's various relationships? Considering this character was DC's reply to Marvel's Wolverine and Punisher, it would be silly to expect anything other than the most ridiculous displays of violence and bloodlust from Lobo: The Main man.

Being a galactic bounty hunter, this Czarnian really only has one rule: he keeps his promises to the letter. That's exactly as confining as it sounds He's free to indulge his sadistic nature by carving a path of destruction through his enemies and contracts.

Lobo is the last of the Czarnians. That might sound tragic, but in "Lobo" 0 it was revealed Lobo unleashed a host of flying scorpions upon Czarnia and single-handedly annihilated the population of the planet.

For fun! If that somehow doesn't persuade you of how bloodthirsty he is, remember that when he died and went to heaven yes, that heaven "Lobo's Back" 4 written by Keith Giffen and Alan Grant, illustrated by Christian Alamy and Daniel Vozzo , he massacred everyone there and was subsequently banished. Hell didn't want him so he's essentially trapped on Earth forever, unable to die even if his incredible regenerative abilities fail him.

Speaking of regenerative abilities, our beloved Deadpool actually began as a supervillain in "New Mutants" 98 written by Rob Liefeld and Fabian Nicienza, illustrated by Liefeld and Steve Buccellato. Over the years, he's grown far more over the top and violent and as a result, more popular. He's immortal and is really neither a hero nor a villain, meaning he's free to indulge himself in violence, especially since he's completely aware that he's a fictional character and none of the blood and gore really matters.

That applies even when that blood and gore is his own, like in "Deadpool Kills Deadpool" 1 written by Cullen Bunn with artwork by Salva Espin and Veronica Gandini , when he killed alternate universe versions of himself violently and on a whim. Heads are separated from shoulders, bodies impaled on street signs and what was it all for? The voice in his head told him to. That's one way to end crime. Arguably more powerful than most comic book superheroes, Spawn's power does have a certain usage limit, but his rage doesn't seem to be so restrained.

He's been to hell and back, and been caught in a war between its forces and the forces of Heaven. Generally, he doesn't really take a side and can usually be found in dark alleys and dangerous situations.

Sometimes he does good things and helps people, but most of the time he's just venting his anger. Seeing as how he lost everything and everyone he loves, he's got a lot of anger to vent. Take, for instance, his battle against Thamuz, grand master of torture and someone who now probably regrets torturing Al. During the "Armageddon" storyline, a more angelic Spawn encounters Thamuz as the latter is rampaging on Earth, as part of Satan and Mammon's apocalyptic plot.

Spawn swiftly defeats Thamuz by punching his face clean off, killing the demon. Though afterwards, his face was pretty Marvel's Frank Castle lost his family in an ill-fated visit to the park where a gangland war took place.

Earlier, we compared Venom to a vengeful spirit, which is exactly what Ghost Rider is. That was probably a pretty good idea, considering Loki is an Asgardian and is basically a god to humans. It's gory stuff, but no less than fans of the character expect. Archived from the original on December 18, Cletus Kasady was just a mild-mannered psychopath and a homicidal sadist, you know, as you do.

Violent marvel characters

Violent marvel characters

Violent marvel characters

Violent marvel characters. Conan The Barbarian

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Once upon a time, Marvel heroes existed to combat the violent people of the world. They have no qualms about using guns, knives, flamethrowers, or good old-fashioned super strength to get their point across in the most violent way possible. What really makes a hero violent, though? A tendency to murder? What separates some violent superheroes is their willingness to go a step beyond the norm, or even just a particular fondness for the routine methods of violence.

Other times, we identify violent superheroes in the Marvel universe by following the trail of blood and bodies that they leave in their wake.

Deathlok was born Michael Collins, a very intelligent, but ultimately average, programmer who was working on a robotic enhancement project that he thought would be used to help amputees.

When Collins found out he was weaponizing humanity, he attempted to have the project shut down. Instead, he became the primary test subject. Shortly after becoming Deathlok, Collins went on a murderous rampage that he was consciously aware of, but ultimately powerless to prevent. Since then, Collins gained a measure of control over his abilities and no longer launches into uncontrollable murderous rampages. Instead, his rampages are mostly of his own volition.

Like father, like son. First appearing during the What if? Given his genetics -- his mother was no slouch in the smashing department, either -- you are right to assume that Skaar is a rather strong lad with a tendency to launch into fits of violent rage, just like his old man. Skaar is not quite as strong as Hulk when the Green Goliath is at his full strength, though. He is also burdened with an inner-child who sometimes serves as his voice of reason and prevents him from really going crazy.

However, when Skaar is on a rampage, all bets are off. Skaar has described himself as a killer of killers, which speaks well to his fondness for violence when he faces off against a particularly savage foe. He also has a bit of a villainous past, contributing to the death of an entire planet. In the beginning -- no, not that beginning -- Namor was a villain. The trouble was that he was such an oddly compelling villain that readers were soon drawn to his chaotic style of justice.

As such, it was decided that the Sub-Mariner should fight Nazis instead, as was the fashion at the time. Through it all, Namor retained a certain attitude not common among heroes of the era.

In fact, he is considered to be one of the first Marvel antiheroes. As is the case with many antiheroes, Namor is not opposed to killing if killing will get the job done. Given that he occasionally dives back into his villainous past -- aquatic pun fully intended -- the Sub-Mariner's official body count includes a mix of heroes and villains.

Of course, that applies to the days we actually know about. Widow has often referenced her somewhat mysterious past and indicated that it is filled with debts to humanity and heroism that will take several lifetimes to repay.

Elektra falls into something of a buffer zone on this list. Elektra is ultimately considered a professional -- one of the best in the world, in fact -- which means that there is at least a theoretical limit to her violent ways.

As time went on and the character enjoyed her own run , we got to see more of what makes Elektra such a fearsome individual. For the most part, Nick Fury occupies the same buffer zone as Elektra. Then, you have stories like the Fury MAX run , which portray the character in a decidedly more ferocious light. Fury MAX , and some other storylines similar to it, suggests that the title character is a man who needs violence and war in his life just as Superman needs the power of our sun to fuel his abilities.

Without that violence, Fury feels that he is lost and dying. As such, he settles for any war he can find. There is a distinct line between heroes in the Marvel universe who exhibit violent qualities and heroes who are murder machines in tights.

Moon Knight is definitely a murder machine in tights. Actually, unlike some of the other heroes mentioned thus far, the Moon Knight just got more violent as a character as the years went on.

This combination of characteristics has led to Moon Knight becoming an increasingly unstable individual. He might be contemplating the capacity of humanity one moment and tearing the face off of his rival the next. Moon Knight's general instability makes him a real wild card who is always capable of tremendous violence. To Venom , or not to Venom? That is the question that haunts this list. There are many characters in the Marvel universe like Venom who spent most of their lives as villains and enjoyed a brief fun as semi-heroic forces.

The question is, do you count them as heroes? He watches over the downtrodden -- especially the homeless -- and does so in a manner that typically involves the violent destruction of whoever is threatening his protectees. A symbiotic, hyper-violent momma bear. In his purest form, the emerald beast is an incredibly violent warrior whose ability to tear through human lives and wreak havoc is surpassed only by his desire to do so.

Hulk is the man who once ripped Wolverine in half and threw his legs on top of a mountain. He does not care, he smashes. What qualifies as a fool in the mind of this character, you ask? The details are irrelevant. The point of the matter is that Foolkiller takes true pleasure in murder. Then again, there is at least one version of Foolkiller who takes equal pleasure in reforming villains. Half-vampire, half-man Blade may mostly kill vampires, but he slays them with such ferocity and regularity that you almost start to feel bad for the hordes of undead that fall to his sword.

Almost, anyway. Actually, Blade is somewhat unique in the Marvel universe, in that he seems to be one of those characters that Marvel writers use to enact their more violent ideas simply because they know there are few audiences that weep over dead vampires. Earlier, we compared Venom to a vengeful spirit, which is exactly what Ghost Rider is. A few people have assumed the Ghost Rider role over the years, but regardless of the person who's taken up the mantle, the hyperviolent nature of the Spirit of Vengeance remains the same.

He is arguably one of the most powerful Marvel heroes in existence, and is certainly one of the most violent. Right from the start, Wolverine was envisioned as a relentlessly brutal character. As writers explored the character further, that ambiguity never really went away. Wolverine was born into violence and gained his trademark adamantium skeleton as the result of a particularly violent experiment designed to turn him into the ultimate weapon.

All things being equal, Wolverine would likely be okay living a semi-peaceful life. The thing about that is that there's always someone out there that gives him cause to inflict tremendous violence. Never one to not put forth his full effort, Wolverine has repeatedly responded to these individuals with a level of brutality that is simply awe-inspiring. Wolverine and Deadpool possess similar abilities to inflict great harm upon those who oppose them. Deadpool sees violence as the ultimate form of vindication.

Of course, Deadpool also takes great pleasure from his most horrific acts. Sure, that means he might occasionally do things like make puppets of his enemies' remains, but if that makes him a bad person, then so be it.

The Punisher is number one with several thousand bullets. Punisher has long ceased trying to justify his actions. The fact that evil exists is enough for him. In the name of destroying that evil, he had done things like rip the entrails of a pedophile out with his bare hands. Did we leave out any of Marvel's most bloodthirsty "heroes" that deserve a spot on this list? Let us know in the comments! Continue scrolling to keep reading Click the button below to start this article in quick view.

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Violent marvel characters

Violent marvel characters