Tracy townsen-The Fall (Thieves of Fate, #2) by Tracy Townsend

An apothecary clerk and her ex-mercenary allies travel across the world to discover a computing engine that leads to secrets she wasn't meant to know--secrets that could destroy humanity. Eight months ago, Rowena Downshire was a half-starved black market courier darting through the shadows of Corma's underside. Today, she's a mostly respectable clerk in the Alchemist's infamous apothecary shop, the Stone Scales, and certainly the last girl one would think qualified to carry the weight of the world on her shoulders a second time. Looks can be deceiving. When Anselm Meteron and the Alchemist receive an invitation to an old acquaintance's ball--the Greatduke who financed their final, disastrous mercenary mission fourteen years earlier--they're expecting blackmail, graft, or veiled threats related to the plot to steal the secrets of the Creator's Grand Experiment.

Tracy townsen

About The Book. Obdurate Ltd 3. Original Title. Average rating 4. We're going to do a 'Ziltoid musical' at the Royal Albert Hall!

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Director: Craig Ross Jr. But on her way to meet him, she is attacked by a creature called an aigamuxa, who steals the book and nearly kills her. Towbsen happens when we start looking back up at the microscope trained on us? Tracy townsen place in an townaen universe in which science has become a religion and God is seen as the great Experimenter, The Nine involves a magical self-scribing book Tracy townsen lists Turkish nude video nine people whose actions will determine the fate of world. Preview — The Nine by Tracy Townsend. Is God's memory that bad? Buried underground? Feb 02, D. It is an astonishingly well-written book - story, dialogue, character creation and development, and world-building done to perfection. Townswn Details Official Sites: Official site. That still doesn't take away from the great performance that Jaszmine Lewis put on. When a young courier fails to deliver her intended package to The Alchemist all hell breaks loose. The writing is complex, but still enjoyable, and the vocabulary unique and intriguing. Metacritic Reviews.

Devin Garrett Townsend born May 5, is a Canadian musician, songwriter and record producer.

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An apothecary clerk and her ex-mercenary allies travel across the world to discover a computing engine that leads to secrets she wasn't meant to know--secrets that could destroy humanity. Eight months ago, Rowena Downshire was a half-starved black market courier darting through the shadows of Corma's underside. Today, she's a mostly respectable clerk in the Alchemist's infamous apothecary shop, the Stone Scales, and certainly the last girl one would think qualified to carry the weight of the world on her shoulders a second time.

Looks can be deceiving. When Anselm Meteron and the Alchemist receive an invitation to an old acquaintance's ball--the Greatduke who financed their final, disastrous mercenary mission fourteen years earlier--they're expecting blackmail, graft, or veiled threats related to the plot to steal the secrets of the Creator's Grand Experiment.

They aren't expecting a job offer they can't refuse or a trip halfway across the world to rendezvous with the scholar whose research threw their lives into tumult: the Reverend Doctor Phillip Chalmers. Escorting Chalmers to the Grand Library of Nippon with her mismatched mercenary family is just a grand adventure to Rowena until she discovers a powerful algebraic engine called the Aggregator.

The Aggregator leads Rowena to questions about the Grand Experiment she was never meant to ask and answers she cannot be allowed to possess. With her reunited friends, Rowena must find a way to use the truths hidden in the Grand Library to disarm those who would hunt down the nine subjects of the Creator's Grand Experiment, threatening to close the book on this world.

Overall, this one is full of religion, science fiction, fantasy, and some of the best characters I've read in a while. By clicking 'Sign me up' I acknowledge that I have read and agree to the privacy policy and terms of use. Must redeem within 90 days. See full terms and conditions and this month's choices. Tell us what you like and we'll recommend books you'll love. Sign up and get a free eBook! The Fall Book 2 of Thieves of Fate. By Tracy Townsend. Trade Paperback. Table of Contents Rave and Reviews.

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IMDb More. The creatures are well detailed and extremely unique, drawing the reader in. Have a nice day and pray hard this experiment works! Color: Color. The worldbuilding that I appreciate does not pose faith or religion in a binary system of good and evil. There's nothing wrong with a book that uses a more philosophical concept just as a backdrop to have fun, but this book just isn't that much fun either.

Tracy townsen

Tracy townsen

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Brian Waddell: Beav on FB. Watch this playlist on YouTube GearWhore, where I use my dubious status in the industry to promote stuff companies have let me have. Its pretty sweet…but to be honest, its rooted in a practical application. The stuff in this series is actually equipment I use to do my job.

Watch this video on YouTube View all Episodes. Hevy Devy Records. All Rights Reserved. Website by Victoria Martinez. All Tour Dates. Load More Follow on Instagram. The Last Juice. Rowena Downshire is the clear lead, revealed as a stubborn, smart, and fierce youth able to take care of herself in harsh, dark world.

Opposite her is the cold, calculating Alchemist who seems sullen but also shows hints of a heart somewhere under his bitter exterior. And, finally, there is Anselm; this cynical and decadent retired mercenary willing to openly proclaim himself a self-serving villain out only for himself.

The interaction between these and all the numerous minor characters quite well done; paths crossing, ideas exchanged and plots moved forward even by the most forgettable scenes and by the most minor of characters. As for the world Rowena and company transverse, it can be best described as a cross between steampunk and gaslamp environment with more than a little flintlock fantasy mix in for good measure. But even with its origins unclear, this is a vividly portrayed place.

The seediness of many locations is palpable. Violence abounds. Bitterness and divisiveness grow nearly unchecked. And the three main races of this world are far different and have many long standing problems with one another.

Humans showing an innate selfishness which far exceeds their needs. The huge Aigamuxa filled with rage that is easy to understand but difficult to completely justify. And the sentient, walking trees called Lanyani both compelling and hard to warm up to.

All of these elements combining to make this a world readers will wish to explore and learn more about. Even with all those things said, I have to admit that there was one main reason I enjoyed this novel: the mysteries explored.

The scenes where certain characters are attempting to decipher the book from God and unravel the universal truths of this cosmos were quite breathtaking. Certainly, the action and adventure expertly interspersed around these more intellectual scenes did help keep my attention riveted to the pages, but the mystery is what kept me turning those pages to find the next nugget of discovery. All in all, The Nine was a fast, easily digested read which entertained and satisfied — but did not make the mistake of fully satisfying, leaving me thinking about unresolved plots and unrevealed mysteries, waiting in anticipation for all my questions to be answered next time.

So with that said, I believe I can call this book a successful debut and leave it at that. I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review. Jul 18, Mary Robinette Kowal rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , recommend. This is a complex, thrilling political, heist novel that has steampunk that makes sense. Glorious, weird, wonderful sense. The characters are vivid and alive and flawed. I am eager for the next book in the series.

Nov 27, Lukasz rated it it was amazing. Rather, it reshapes various fantasy subgenres in an engrossing tale that takes place in an alternate universe. Imagine a world where Science has become a religion. God the Experimentor maintains life as an experiment. He continually reevaluates his experiment by observing the way The Nine randomly chosen human beings whose names remain unknown to anyone but God live their lives.

Thirteen-year-old underworld courier Rowena Downshire loses a book that writes itself to a creature called Aiganamuxa. Afraid of her brutal patron Ivor, she chooses to report the theft to book recipient — infamous and dreadful Alchemist.

They become the target of conspirators who seek to use the book for their own ends. The Nine hooked me from page one. Mix of imaginative secondary world, vulnerable and relatable characters and a layered plot was hard to resist.

It gives plenty of space for spinning and reassessing ecclesiastical theories. Religion, though, is just one side of the story focused on character arcs. The idea of creation being an ongoing experiment is fun, but the book focus lies elsewhere.

Parts of the plot intertwine in surprising ways, and some twists are genuinely surprising. All ideas presented in the book come together in elegant ways. The world is admirably dark, filled with people struggling to survive in poorly lit alleys.

Apart from humans, there are two other races in the city — anatomically impossible aigamuxa with eyes in the soles of their feet and Lanyani — kind of living trees that enjoy feeding on human bodies. Characters presented in the book are well portrayed.

Rowena is stubborn, loyal and fierce. The Alchemist POV is introduced later in the book, so while we observe him through other characters eyes, he seems reserved and sullen. Anselm is cool. He describes himself as a villain with a penchant for self-aggrandisement and a portfolio of maladjusted habits.

At one time he states: Turpitude is my problem, not degeneracy. A law-abiding life was out of the question from the start. Also, interactions between the three characters are done very well. Killing cool characters is uncool, you know. If you look for intelligent, well-plotted book that mashes political intrigues, conspiracies, heists, found family, steam- and clockpunk stylings, redemption arcs, interspecies conflict and grey morality, you can stop right now.

This is it. Do yourself a favour and grab a copy. Nov 27, Kristen Burns rated it really liked it Shelves: own-physical , cover-love , fantasy , reviewed , review-copy , readbooks.

This has not influenced my review. By the time I finished, my favorite thing about this book was the three main characters. Rowena was a scrappy, willful, street-smart orphan. The Alchemist has done some things in his past that were not ok, but he was very sweet and fatherly to Rowena, despite his stoic nature. Anselm was kind of an asshole, but entertainingly and charmingly so.

And by the end of the book, I was rooting for this strange little group of allies. I also loved the dynamic between the three main characters and seeing how it evolved as the story went on into a sweet little found family. Another thingI appreciated that the author didn't try to sugarcoat or downplay the selfish and negative aspects of any of the characters.

Most of them weren't great people, and the author just presented them as they were without making excuses for their behaviors. There were reasons and motivations and sometimes good traits and behaviors in addition to the bad, but not excuses. And that only makes it that much better that I still liked some of them anyway.

The world was bit hard to get a grip onkind of an odd mix of time and place and real and fantasybut there was a lot of uniqueness and detail in it. Note: I thought this was high fantasy when I read it, but after reading the second book I realized it's kind of an alternate Earth.

There were groups with different religious beliefs, a whole society and backstory, and a few different types of creatures: humans, lanyani basically living trees , and aigamuxa monstrous humanoid beings with eyes on the bottom of their feet. There was even a bit of a steampunk feel. And the premise of there being nine people chosen by God to help him gather data for his experiment, in order to decide whether humanity was worth, is one that I've certainly never seen before.

It was fairly slow-paced for a while, with the occasional bout of action, but it got more interesting as it went on and picked up some speed near the end. So overall, as I said, this book took me a while to get into, but, by the end, I was hooked and looking forward to spending more time with this strangely lovable team of street urchins and ex-mercenaries! Recommended For: Anyone who likes alternate Earth fantasy worlds, scrappy underdogs, ex-mercs with soft sides, and cute character dynamics.

Original Review Metaphors and Moonlight Nov 05, Lynn Williams rated it it was amazing. Who am I kidding with 4. So, before I have a chance to mess this up — read this book. It is that simple. I just loved this book. The imagination at work here is wonderful, I loved the world that the author has created and more than that I loved the characters.

Complex because of the characters and the roles they play, intricate because of the detail and attention that bring everything to life for the reader and simple in that the plot fundamentally revolves around a book.

It hooked me from the first few pages and then reeled me in until I was completely absorbed in this world. As the story begins we make the introduction of Rowena Downshire, a young girl who works as a courier and is about to take on more work as one of the other couriers has gone missing.

Rowena works for a black marketeer called Ivor. Nobody double crosses Ivor. Rowena finds herself on route to the Alchemist with an important delivery when she is attacked and robbed. Her choices are simple, she can continue on to the Alchemist and seek help, although his reputation is little better, if not worse, than that of Ivor, or she can face her employer and a beating that she might never wake up from. The world building. I loved the world created here.

The book is full of imagination and new ideas. In terms of the other species here we have the Lanyani and Aigamuxa. What creations are these! Similarly the Lanyani — an equally fascinating creation that puts me in mind of a tree ent combined with all the endearing qualities of a triffid.

These two just blew my mind. The characters. How I love these characters. All of them, good and bad. They all come together in the most perfect way to make this story a rollercoaster of emotions.

Rowena has grown up on the mean streets of Corma, she is threaded through with steely determination and yet something in her undoubtedly brings out the better side in others — as it will do in you the reader.

I really cared for Rowena. The Alchemist, also known as the Bear, is also a wonderful creation and one that I just loved. Finally, Anselm.

Oh dear God what has happened to me — I loved his character too. And the three of them together. What can I say. I have no criticisms. The only thing I would say about this book is that you need to fully immerse yourself. This is a book that needs reading and digesting. So, if you fancy a dark fantasy, packed with ideas, full of intrigue, populated with imaginative species and characters you can love, hate and fear then grab yourself a copy of this. Do yourself a favour and give it a shot.

I received a copy through Edelweiss, courtesy of the publisher — for which my thanks. The above is my own opinion. Nov 04, Tammy rated it it was amazing.

The nitty-gritty: A complex and unique story that delivers on all levels. Simply brilliant! Add in unique and unusual world-building and an intricate caper story and you have a very special book. There are a lot of players in this story, however, so readers will need to be patient while Townsend takes her time introducing us to all of them.

One day Rowena is tasked with delivering an old book to the Alchemist, a dangerous man believed to have magical powers. But on her way to meet him, she is attacked by a creature called an aigamuxa, who steals the book and nearly kills her. Meanwhile, the Reverend Doctor Phillip Chalmers receives a packet of secret notes from his associate Nora Pierce, having to do with their research into a theory about the Grand Experiment, which suggests that God has chosen nine people to watch and judge, and the actions of these Nine will determine the fate of humanity.

The book that Rowena was supposed to take to the Alchemist is a magical book that writes by itself, and Phillip believes it is the hand of God himself making notations. But now Nora is missing, and the book has fallen into the hands of the enemy. And when Chalmers discovers the identity of one of the Nine, he must protect that information at all costs.

In fact, I read half the book before I figured out who the characters on the cover are Rowena, the Alchemist and Anselm , because the cast is so large. In this world, there are three intelligent species who share space: humans, of course; the aigamuxa, huge beasts whose eyes are on the bottoms of their feet which believe me, makes for some very odd visuals! The aigamuxa play a big part in this story, as they are responsible for a lot of the violence, but I also felt sorry for them.

Not only has she had to learn street smarts, but her boss Ivor regularly beats her, and more than once during the story she ends up being pummeled by an aigamuxa. Even better, when she meets the Alchemist, their bond becomes one of a father and daughter, something the fatherless Rowena truly needs in her brutal life. When Meteron enters the picture, the three of them form an unlikely family unit that was unusual but heartwarming.

The Alchemist was another of my favorite characters. He also has an interesting power that comes in very handy during the story!

Rare and Meteron have an There are lots of tangled familial relationships among the characters which made the story even more interesting. The whole idea of the Nine was fascinating, and I loved the way science and religion seem to go hand in hand in this world. This book can be challenging at times, but sometimes challenging books can be the most rewarding. Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy. Dec 06, Derpa rated it liked it Shelves: series , the-main-was-not-so-interesting , my-jam , sidechars-of-awesome , cover-love.

This one is typical for the type of books that have good ideas, start out great, then the problems kick in and you become a lot less enthusiastic about them. It's also I wouldn't say the author used up her awesome ideas when she should have waited, but this would have been better if it was refined. In Corma religion and science got united, so the commonly held belief is that God is a scientist who looks upon the world as an experiment and people are just the rats running around This one is typical for the type of books that have good ideas, start out great, then the problems kick in and you become a lot less enthusiastic about them.

In Corma religion and science got united, so the commonly held belief is that God is a scientist who looks upon the world as an experiment and people are just the rats running around in the labyrinth. The Nine refers to the nine most important people God is interested in observing, the nine who have to justify the necessity of the whole existence of the world. The catch? Nobody knows who they are. They could be the hobo down the street or the mayor.

They also don't know what kind of an outcome is expected by God, what he wants to see or find out. Scientist priests decided they could approach God the most through hard work in scientific fields, but nobody knows anything for sure.

The city of Corma is kind of shitty, though, full of crime and such. Rowena is one of the many, many street urchins who managed to find work as a delivery girl for a semi-legal businessman. Through her work she gets involved with some big things that endanger her.

She has to team up with they mysterious Alchemist and a man dealing in some criminal matters to see the end of it. I remember reading A Madness of Angels a few years back and thinking Kate Griffin was the most annoyingly verbose author ever.

All the sentences had way too many adjectives that made it uncomfortable to read any of it and I quit three books in which I should have done earlier, but I used to be an idiot with too much time This one wasn't quite so bad at that. Really, some scenes flowed quite nicely. Still, it wasn't tight enough, some sentences made me think of teenagers trying to just My favourite example: "I could write about that scent pressing into my cheek a thousand times over and still not find the words to say how much it mattered.

Stop with the flowery crap, don't thesaurus us to death. Just do your fun ideas and different characters and such. This is not needed. Rowena was my other problem. She isn't too bad, she wasn't an annoying little snowflake who is too special and perfect for this world, which is how many teenage girl characters are written nowadays. It's especially weird because she is supposedly someone important. The side characters were much more fun, though. The Alchemist and Anselm were both kind of fun and interesting.

I also really liked the scientist Chalmers. Luckily this book works with all of them, not just Rowena, so that works. I wouldn't say any of the lot twists were that big. You can see them coming, I think the most clever part about this book was the world building and the basic idea.

On the other hand we didn't get into the big, overarching story too much, so I have no idea how long this series is meant to be. If it's a trilogy then I have no idea how we'll have any story that opens up the world, but if it's longer everything should be fine. Of course maybe I will be surprised. We'll see. I'm definitely going to read the next book, not because this was that much of a favourite of mine, but because I think with some guidance and learning the author can do much, much better.

A side note; I love the colours and the artwork of the cover, I just wish the human forms would have been bigger, because they look good, just small. I am iffy about human faces being on the cover, because it can be a kind of This one is pretty good, though. I like smaller authors putting effort into their covers, because that stuff does work. Have a nice day and pray hard this experiment works!

Dec 06, Dezideriu Szabo rated it it was amazing. Right when I knew exactly what my favorite books of were, this Rare Jewel came out of the nowhere and blew me away.

Superb characters and the best idea I heard in years. This is the best fantasy or whatever strange gender this is debut of the year and probably one of the best books of the year. View all 3 comments. Aug 02, Laura A. I won a free copy at Readercon. I was not asked to write a review or recommend it to anyone, but really, I felt I had to get the word out.

Because I was hooked from the moment I first heard Tracy Townsend do a reading of a whole 2. It was that good. I won the copy and stayed up far too late reading it, immersing myself in the world a The Nine: Thieves of Fate - Book One Full disclosure — I did not purchase this book. I won the copy and stayed up far too late reading it, immersing myself in the world and characters she created. This will be spoiler-free review, so please read without fear.

By far the most interesting part of the world-building to me did not revolve around technology or environment more on those later. The most fascinating part was the invention of Theosophy The science of religion and what happens to religious fervor when Reason and scientific principles are the foundations of a theology. Fundamentalism and devotion to reason can overstep concern for people, making it not too different from current religious practices, but in an entirely new way.

Because what happens when humanity realizes that God is a scientist too, studying the creation? And what happens when the object of study starts studying back?

What happens when we start looking back up at the microscope trained on us? Does God make mistakes? It would seem so. And I love the idea of god as scientist and note-taker. The point of view characters that provide glimpses into other parts of the world, and other sentient species are the other delicious slices of this world. The three sentient species sharing the planet are only sparsely drawn in, and yet, they imbue the world with the color that would otherwise be lacking with just human habitation.

In all, the mixture made for rich reading. My one overarching question that kept coming up during my initial reading of the book involved the technology in this world. At times it seemed steampunk in nature, at times Dickensian, and at others, as if particle physics was well established. You see, the plot and characters and world swept me along, so I read this in huge gulps, a desiccated lanyani whose roots have just found water, sucking it up with abandon and fervor.

Perhaps on closer reading, that question would resolve itself, and if so, I promise to write an addendum to this review correcting that impression. Overall, what I can say is read this book. Read it for the world, for the ideas presented, for the questions it will raise. Read it for the plot and for the characters.

Read it for the religion. Read it and then tell your friends to read it. Feb 02, D. Palmer rated it it was amazing Shelves: fantasy.

The Nine is awesome. A fantastic debut and perfect introduction that left me wanting more of the adventure and wonder that it already delivers in spades. Corma is a unique but familiar city that satisfies a Victorian, Industrial Revolution craving while standing squarely in another world filled with an addictive mix of modern and familiar along with antique and fantastically outmoded tech. This is a world of rust and sparking coils, horsecarts rolling alongside gyroscopic automobiles, The Nine is awesome.

This is a world of rust and sparking coils, horsecarts rolling alongside gyroscopic automobiles, and secret cabals of starch-collared priests working with and against street thugs, alchemists, and master thieves. Moreover, The Nine shows us an intriguing amalgam of Science and Religion, a theo-technocracy that bears along with it all the wonders and terrors that could spring from a society that values Reason and Rationality above all else.

Townsend populates this already fascinating world with impeccably defined characters — urchin Rowena, the mysterious Alchemist, roguish Anselm Meteron, menacing Nasrahiel — and wonderous new sentients living alongside humans: the hulking aigamuxa, drawn from Khoekhoe myth, and the inscrutable lanyani. Feb 15, Alec Hutson rated it it was amazing.

I'm going to break with my long-established practices and write a review for a book I'm not finished with. I'm really so impressed - this book deserves to break out, and I hope it does. There are a lot of similarities, actually, between this book and the His Dark Materia I'm going to break with my long-established practices and write a review for a book I'm not finished with. There are a lot of similarities, actually, between this book and the His Dark Materials series by Pullman.

I'm on such a great run of discovering new authors, and I want everyone else out there to discover Ms. Townsend as well. Nov 14, Jena rated it it was amazing. It had been a bloody awful way to live. And the characters! Rowena Downshire is a young girl trying to make it in a cutthroat world.

Her mother, and only living relative, is locked in a debtors prison. Everything she earns, and most of what she steals, goes to paying down that debt. But, with new charges always being added, the battle feels never-ending to her.

Her job as a courier for a black market delivery boss is the best life she can hope for, even if he is cold and brutal and unforgiving. When Rowena is robbed delivering a mysterious book that seems to write itself to the even more mysterious and feared Alchemist, Rowena is terrified Ivor is going to kill her for the blunder.

Deciding to risk going straight to the Alchemist instead, she finds herself in the middle of a complex and deadly mystery. His research with his partner Doctor Revered Nora Pierce was exciting, but he should have known she would push boundaries.

Now, days before they are give the keynote speech in front of their peers, Nora has gone missing. When a young girl courier delivers a note from Nora making him fear the worst, he insists on giving the girl the book that started it all. Rowena and The Alchemist, also known as The Bear, turn to Anselm Meteron, former mercenary and all around nefarious character for help. They have a history extending far back, though how exactly they are intertwined comes much later in the book.

There is a lot happening within these pages. The Nine is an amazing blend of both plot and character driven momentum and each page demands to be turned so that you can be closer to unraveling the answers to all the questions presented. It is complex in all the very best ways! The world building is fascinating. It feels as if it could be our own world propelled far into some distant future, but the addition of the species the lanyani and the aigamuxa makes it clear it is a world far different from ours.

With nods to steampunk, this world is detailed and unique. One of the most fascinating parts of the plot was the blending of religion and science. In fact, this is one of the key tenets of the plot, the book that God wrote to keep track of his experiment, The Nine. The tenets of the science was well done as well. Not overly explained, but not vague and uninteresting. I actually really liked how it was presented, examined and how it tied into the plot. We get many more characters sprinkled throughout these pages, and even the more minor characters are very fleshed out.

Rare was one of my favorites, although, she did drive me crazy with some of her decisions. City Inspector Gammon, Beth and Lord Regenzi were some of the more notable side players, and it was very interesting how their importance was woven in. But none of them quite weaseled their way into my heart the way Anselm did. How can you NOT love someone who introduces themselves like that?!

I want to be friends with Anselm and all his maladjusted habits. Also, is it bad form to steal that line for all future introductions? In all, this was a very fast, very enjoyable read. The Nine is a first in a series, and I know I am dying for book two!

Amazing debut and I am thrilled I was able to read this! If you love complex fantasy with amazing characters, awesome world building and a ton of mystery, this book is definitely for you! Thank you Prometheus books for sending me a copy to read and review! Jan 27, Tracy Rowan rated it liked it. I am deeply ambivalent about this book, so I think I'm going to go through the things which pleased me first, and then the things which absolutely did not.

First, it's reasonably well-written in spite of awkward passages that sometimes bring the story to a grinding halt. The prose can be a pleasure to read in a purely aesthetic sense, though, and the universe is well realized, making it a world that the reader can enter easily.

The characters are fairly well-developed. We get enoug I am deeply ambivalent about this book, so I think I'm going to go through the things which pleased me first, and then the things which absolutely did not. We get enough to understand what makes them tick, which is important. But the fudge factor is, for me anyway, twofold. First, the plotline, with which I have two problems. Nine people to serve as indicators of how humanity is doing in general doesn't seem like a big sample to me. I'm not sure how many people live in this universe, but even seems a bit mingy if you're going to measure the success or failure of a species.

And we don't even know what God is looking for. But okay, let's for a moment assume that we buy this. Now it's in human hands and this is what everyone is after. Is God's memory that bad? Again, okay, I can suspend my disbelief on this one. And let me get the purely picayune complaint out the way first.

How do you even pronounce that word? That kind of thing bothers me because I love words and language. Aigamuxas are these creatures that have their eyes in their feet.

No, I'm not kidding. They have to lift up a foot to look at anything, giving the impression that they walk on their eyeballs, though some passages suggest that the things are in their heels, which could mean not only that they can only see when they lift up their feet, but they're always looking backward.

They also swing through the air like apes, which seems weird if they can't see what they're grabbing hold of. I could also do about ten minutes on the concept of binocular vision and depth perception, but I'm not going to because I shouldn't have to.

These things are ridiculous, and frankly they threw me right out of the story every time they showed up. Y'know what? That's bad. You don't want to lose your readers over a lack of common sense. It may seem like a small problem but it means that one of the primary groups of players in this book is so badly thought out that they seem ridiculous.

How they're supposed to be horrifying is beyond me. In the end, there are things to like about the book and things which made me roll my eyes and wonder what Townsend was thinking. I don't think I'm going to be reading the rest of the series. Because it did start out well. Aug 13, Angela Burkhead rated it really liked it Shelves: first-reads.

This is one of those books where people are going to be hesitant to read and ask, "Yeah, but Is it a religious book? Every time 'god' is involved, people like me are completely turned off and don't want to risk it. It's annoying being hounded with christian garble when our life This is one of those books where people are going to be hesitant to read and ask, "Yeah, but It's annoying being hounded with christian garble when our life experiences have been so negative because of organized religion.

So, to clear up any confusion, the answer is no. This is not 'that' kind of book. Yes, there is a search for 'god' and whether 'god' is behind the mysteries of this magical self writing book, but nothing in this book will make you uncomfortable and you certainly won't be exposed to any religious nonsense. I can't say I've ever actually read a Hard-crime Fantasy novel before, but The Nine would definitely fit that category.

Someone's watching, someone's keeping score, and the world may be at the mercy of nine unknowing subjects of a mysterious experiment being studied by religious scientists in their hopes to present the world with solid proof that god exists.

But gathering evidence proves more difficult, and more dangerous than they could ever have imagined. Rowena Downshire is one of the last people to believe a god could possibly exist, but being faced with a self writing book taking notes on the world she lives in has left her open to the possibility But not that open to it.

Her part to play is small, deliver the package and get paid. She never imagined just how quickly that one delivery would become a life changing event. The book covers the span of a few days and so moves quickly in plot, though there is a lot of information to savor and digest before reaching the final conclusion. There's a lot to learn about this world and the creatures that inhabit it.

Tracy Townsend has created a whole new world to discover and there are a lot of questions left unanswered for the series to continue and build upon the foundation The Nine has begun.

If you enjoy complex world building, research based discoveries, and fantastical creatures, then I think this is a book for you. Oct 22, USOM rated it it was amazing. This kept me up reading till the morning. Around percent through it became impossible to put down. I need the sequel NOW!

The characters are amazingly complex, and damaged, and tender, and just so cute together. The plot is always surprising me and I was hooked. AND the world building is rich. It is such a unique idea and it is explained fantastically.

It never felt like world dump, and it also made sense.

Devin Townsend - Wikipedia

Four kegs were floated and two more were bought. We even had one person who was on the Missing Person List show up. Coney Island. Dancin' to the music. Steven Bubba Stobaugh and his wife, Sandy. Rumor has it that Cheryl was Chris' 7th grade girlfriend. Kacie Pullig Layman. Todd Harper visiting with Dave. Melinda Knight. Kevin Ryan. Cheryl Gayler Parker and her husband, John. John Alcala looking over the crowd.

Cindy Clark Byrd. Craig Kisor. Elaine Fannin Tate. Another view of the Friday night crowd. Jay jammin' with the band. Lane and Brandi Becknell Worthington. Angela Dickson Class of '82 and Cyndy Bryce listening to Elaine Fannin instruct them in the proper etiquette for drinking at a mixer.

Mike McEnrue visits with Martha Aycock. Rusty Gray showing off his kids to Valery French Frank. From the look on Tracy Townsen's face, it's pretty obvious that she's trying to figure out if she knows the other person. Christy Tuckness visiting with Julie Massey. Kim Faircloth Davis lost in the crowd! Kacie Pullig and Karen Wood. Marina Vargas and Angie Jennison make a toast.

Don Robinson deep in thought. Chris Conrad and Julie Young. Christmas Cards Family Picnic and Memorial Service. Emails Two. John Glenn. Current Photos. Current Photos Two.

Missing Persons. Gone But Not Forgotten. Reunion List. Favorite Links. The Mixer on Friday night was a huge success. Coney Island Dancin' to the music. Another view of the Friday night crowd Jay jammin' with the band.

Tracy townsen

Tracy townsen

Tracy townsen